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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

names, and that as naturally and openly as though he or you were 

speaking of his head or his foot. Convention has, for various 

reasons, made it impossible to speak in this way in public. But 

you can, at any rate, break through this in the nursery. There 

this rule of convention has no advantage, and many a serious 

disadvantage. It is easy to say to a child, the first time he 

makes an 'awkward' remark in public: 'Look here, laddie, you may 

say what you like to me or to daddy, but, for some reason or 

other, one does not talk about these' (only say _what_ things) 

'in public.' Only let your child make the remark in public 

_before_ you speak (never mind the shock to your caller's 

feelings), don't warn him against doing so" (Ennis Richmond, 

_Boyhood_, p. 60). Sex must always be a mystery, but, as Mrs. 

Richmond rightly says, "the real and true mysteries of generation 

and birth are very different from the vulgar secretiveness with 

which custom surrounds them." 

 

The question as to the precise names to be given to the more 

private bodily parts and functions is sometimes a little 

difficult to solve. Every mother will naturally follow her own 

instincts, and probably her own traditions, in this matter. I 

have elsewhere pointed out (in the study of "The Evolution of 

Modesty") how widespread and instinctive is the tendency to adopt 

constantly new euphemisms in this field. The ancient and simple 

words, which in England a great poet like Chaucer could still use 

rightly and naturally, are so often dropped in the mud by the 

vulgar that there is an instinctive hesitation nowadays in 

applying them to beautiful uses. They are, however, 

unquestionably the best, and, in their origin, the most dignified 

and expressive words. Many persons are of opinion that on this 

account they should be rescued from the mud, and their sacredness 

taught to children. A medical friend writes that he always taught 

his son that the vulgar sex names are really beautiful words of 

ancient origin, and that when we understand them aright we cannot 

possibly see in them any motive for low jesting. They are simple, 

serious and solemn words, connoting the most central facts of 

life, and only to ignorant and plebeian vulgarity can they cause 

obscene mirth. An American man of science, who has privately and 

anonymously printed some pamphlets on sex questions, also takes 

this view, and consistently and methodically uses the ancient 

and simple words. I am of opinion that this is the ideal to be 

sought, but that there are obvious difficulties at present in the 

way of attaining it. In any case, however, the mother should be 

in possession of a very precise vocabulary for all the bodily 

parts and acts which it concerns her children to know. 

 

 

 

It is sometimes said that at this early age children should not be told, 

even in a simple and elementary form, the real facts of their origin but 

should, instead, hear a fairy-tale having in it perhaps some kind of 

symbolic truth. This contention may be absolutely rejected, without 

thereby, in any degree, denying the important place which fairy-tales hold 

in the imagination of young children. Fairy-tales have a real value to the 

child; they are a mental food he needs, if he is not to be spiritually 

starved; to deprive him of fairy-tales at this age is to do him a wrong 

which can never be made up at any subsequent age. But not only are sex 

matters too vital even in childhood to be safely made matter for a 

fairy-tale, but the real facts are themselves as wonderful as any 


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