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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

fairy-tale, and appeal to the child's imagination with as much force as a 

fairy-tale. 

 

Even, however, if there were no other reasons against telling children 

fairy-tales of sex instead of the real facts, there is one reason which 

ought to be decisive with every mother who values her influence over her 

child. He will very quickly discover, either by information from others or 

by his own natural intelligence, that the fairy-tale, that was told him in 

reply to a question about a simple matter of fact, was a lie. With that 

discovery his mother's influence over him in all such matters vanishes for 

ever, for not only has a child a horror of being duped, but he is 

extremely sensitive about any rebuff of this kind, and never repeats what 

he has been made to feel was a mistake to be ashamed of. He will not 

trouble his mother with any more questions on this matter; he will not 

confide in her; he will himself learn the art of telling "fairy-tales" 

about sex matters. He had turned to his mother in trust; she had not 

responded with equal trust, and she must suffer the punishment, as 

Henriette Fuerth puts it, of seeing "the love and trust of her son stolen 

from her by the first boy he makes friends with in the street." When, as 

sometimes happens (Moll mentions a case), a mother goes on repeating these 

silly stories to a girl or boy of seven who is secretly well-informed, she 

only degrades herself in her child's eyes. It is this fatal mistake, so 

often made by mothers, which at first leads them to imagine that their 

children are so innocent, and in later years causes them many hours of 

bitterness because they realize they do not possess their children's 

trust. In the matter of trust it is for the mother to take the first step; 

the children who do not trust their mothers are, for the most part, merely 

remembering the lesson they learned at their mother's knee. 

 

The number of little books and pamphlets dealing with the 

question of the sexual enlightenment of the young--whether 

intended to be read by the young or offering guidance to mothers 

and teachers in the task of imparting knowledge--has become very 

large indeed during recent years in America, England, and 

especially Germany, where there has been of late an enormous 

production of such literature. The late Ben Elmy, writing under 

the pseudonym of "Ellis Ethelmer," published two booklets, _Baby 

Buds_, and _The Human Flower_ (issued by Mrs. Wolstenholme Elmy, 

Buxton House, Congleton), which state the facts in a simple and 

delicate manner, though the author was not a notably reliable 

guide on the scientific aspects of these questions. A charming 

conversation between a mother and child, from a French source, is 

reprinted by Edward Carpenter at the end of his _Love's Coming of 

Age. How We Are Born_, by Mrs. N.J. (apparently a Russian lady 

writing in English), prefaced by J.H. Badley, is satisfactory. 

Mention may also be made of _The Wonder of Life_, by Mary Tudor 

Pole. Margaret Morley's _Song of Life_, an American book, which I 

have not seen, has been highly praised. Most of these books are 

intended for quite young children, and while they explain more or 

less clearly the origin of babies, nearly always starting with 

the facts of plant life, they touch very slightly, if at all, on 

the relations of the sexes. 

 

Mrs. Ennis Richmond's books, largely addressed to mothers, deal 

with these questions in a very sane, direct, and admirable 

manner, and Canon Lyttelton's books, discussing such questions 


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