Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

generally, are also excellent. Most of the books now to be 

mentioned are intended to be read by boys and girls who have 

reached the age of puberty. They refer more or less precisely to 

sexual relationships, and they usually touch on masturbation. 

_The Story of Life_, written by a very accomplished woman, the 

late Ellice Hopkins, is somewhat vague, and introduces too many 

exalted religious ideas. Arthur Trewby's _Healthy Boyhood_ is a 

little book of wholesome tendency; it deals specially with 

masturbation. _A Talk with Boys About Themselves_ and _A Talk 

with Girls About Themselves_, both by Edward Bruce Kirk (the 

latter book written in conjunction with a lady) deal with general 

as well as sexual hygiene. There could be no better book to put 

into the hands of a boy or girl at puberty than M.A. Warren's 

_Almost Fourteen_, written by an American school teacher in 1892. 

It was a most charming and delicately written book, which could 

not have offended the innocence of the most sensitive maiden. 

Nothing, however, is sacred to prurience, and it was easy for the 

prurient to capture the law and obtain (in 1897) legal 

condemnation of this book as "obscene." Anything which sexually 

excites a prurient mind is, it is true, "obscene" for that mind, 

for, as Mr. Theodore Schroeder remarks, obscenity is "the 

contribution of the reading mind," but we need such books as this 

in order to diminish the number of prurient minds, and the 

condemnation of so entirely admirable a book makes, not for 

morality, but for immorality. I am told that the book was 

subsequently issued anew with most of its best portions omitted, 

and it is stated by Schroeder (_Liberty of Speech and Press 

Essential to Purity Propaganda_, p. 34) that the author was 

compelled to resign his position as a public school principal. 

Maria Lischnewska's _Geschlechtliche Belehrung der Kinder_ 

(reprinted from _Mutterschutz_, 1905, Heft 4 and 5) is a most 

admirable and thorough discussion of the whole question of sexual 

education, though the writer is more interested in the teacher's 

share in this question than in the mother's. Suggestions to 

mothers are contained in Hugo Salus, _Wo kommen die Kinder her?_, 

E. Stiehl, _Eine Mutterpflicht_, and many other books. Dr. Alfred 

Kind strongly recommends Ludwig Gurlitt's _Der Verkehr mit meinem 

Kindern_, more especially in its combination of sexual education 

with artistic education. Many similar books are referred to by 

Bloch, in his _Sexual Life of Our Time_, Ch. xxvi. 

 

I have enumerated the names of these little books because they 

are frequently issued in a semi-private manner, and are seldom 

easy to procure or to hear of. The propagation of such books 

seems to be felt to be almost a disgraceful action, only to be 

performed by stealth. And such a feeling seems not unnatural when 

we see, as in the case of the author of _Almost Fourteen_, that a 

nominally civilized country, instead of loading with honors a man 

who has worked for its moral and physical welfare, seeks so far 

as it can to ruin him. 

 

I may add that while it would usually be very helpful to a mother 

to be acquainted with a few of the booklets I have named, she 

would do well, in actually talking to her children, to rely 

mainly on her own knowledge and inspiration. 

 

The sexual education which it is the mother's duty and privilege to 

initiate during her child's early years cannot and ought not to be 

technical. It is not of the nature of formal instruction but is a private 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward