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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

disagreeable symptoms before the period (such as headache, 

malaise, irritability of temper), while forty-four complained of 

other symptoms besides pain during the period (especially 

headache and great weakness). Jane Kelley Sabine (quoted in 

_Boston Medical and Surgical Journal_, Sept. 15, 1904) found in 

New England schools among two thousand girls that 75 per cent. 

had menstrual troubles, 90 per cent. had leucorrhoea and ovarian 

neuralgia, and 60 per cent. had to give up work for two days 

during each month. These results seem more than usually 

unfavorable, but are significant, as they cover a large number of 

cases. The conditions in the Pacific States are not much better. 

Dr. Mary Ritter (in a paper read before the California State 

Medical Society in 1903) stated that of 660 Freshmen girls at the 

University of California, 67 per cent. were subject to menstrual 

disorders, 27 per cent. to headaches, 30 per cent. to backaches, 

29 per cent. were habitually constipated, 16 per cent. had 

abnormal heart sounds; only 23 per cent. were free from 

functional disturbances. Dr. Helen MacMurchey, in an interesting 

paper on "Physiological Phenomena Preceding or Accompanying 

Menstruation" (_Lancet_, Oct. 5, 1901), by inquiries among one 

hundred medical women, nurses, and women teachers in Toronto 

concerning the presence or absence of twenty-one different 

abnormal menstrual phenomena, found that between 50 and 60 per 

cent. admitted that they were liable at this time to disturbed 

sleep, to headache, to mental depression, to digestive 

disturbance, or to disturbance of the special senses, while about 

25 to 50 per cent. were liable to neuralgia, to vertigo, to 

excessive nervous energy, to defective nervous and muscular 

power, to cutaneous hyperaesthesia, to vasomotor disturbances, to 

constipation, to diarrhoea, to increased urination, to cutaneous 

eruption, to increased liability to take cold, or to irritating 

watery discharges before or after the menstrual discharge. This 

inquiry is of much interest, because it clearly brings out the 

marked prevalence at menstruation of conditions which, though not 

necessarily of any gravity, yet definitely indicate decreased 

power of resistance to morbid influences and diminished 

efficiency for work. 

 

How serious an impediment menstrual troubles are to a woman is 

indicated by the fact that the women who achieve success and fame 

seem seldom to be greatly affected by them. To that we may, in 

part, attribute the frequency with which leaders of the women's 

movement have treated menstruation as a thing of no importance in 

a woman's life. Adele Gerhard, and Helene Simon, also, in their 

valuable and impartial work, _Mutterschaft und Geistige Arbeit_ 

(p. 312), failed to find, in their inquiries among women of 

distinguished ability, that menstruation was regarded as 

seriously disturbing to work. 

 

Of late the suggestion that adolescent girls shall not only rest 

from work during two days of the menstrual period, but have an 

entire holiday from school during the first year of sexual life, 

has frequently been put forward, both from the medical and the 

educational side. At the meeting of the Association of Registered 

Medical Women, already referred to, Miss Sturge spoke of the good 

results obtained in a school where, during the first two years 

after puberty, the girls were kept in bed for the first two days 

of each menstrual period. Some years ago Dr. G.W. Cook ("Some 


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