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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Disorders of Menstruation," _American Journal of Obstetrics_, 

April, 1896), after giving cases in point, wrote: "It is my 

deliberate conviction that no girl should be confined at study 

during the year of her puberty, but she should live an outdoor 

life." In an article on "Alumna's Children," by "An Alumna" 

(_Popular Science Monthly_, May, 1904), dealing with the sexual 

invalidism of American women and the severe strain of motherhood 

upon them, the author, though she is by no means hostile to 

education, which is not, she declares, at fault, pleads for rest 

for the pubertal girl. "If the brain claims her whole vitality, 

how can there be any proper development? Just as very young 

children should give all their strength for some years solely to 

physical growth before the brain is allowed to make any 

considerable demands, so at this critical period in the life of 

the woman nothing should obstruct the right of way of this 

important system. A year at the least should be made especially 

easy for her, with neither mental nor nervous strain; and 

throughout the rest of her school days she should have her 

periodical day of rest, free from any study or overexertion." In 

another article on the same subject in the same journal ("The 

Health of American Girls," Sept., 1907), Nellie Comins Whitaker 

advocates a similar course. "I am coming to be convinced, 

somewhat against my wish, that there are many cases when the girl 

ought to be taken out of school entirely for some months or for a 

year _at the period of puberty_." She adds that the chief 

obstacle in the way is the girl's own likes and dislikes, and the 

ignorance of her mother who has been accustomed to think that 

pain is a woman's natural lot. 

 

Such a period of rest from mental strain, while it would fortify 

the organism in its resistance to any reasonable strain later, 

need by no means be lost for education in the wider sense of the 

word, for the education required in classrooms is but a small 

part of the education required for life. Nor should it by any 

means be reserved merely for the sickly and delicate girl. The 

tragic part of the present neglect to give girls a really sound 

and fitting education is that the best and finest girls are 

thereby so often ruined. Even the English policeman, who 

admittedly belongs in physical vigor and nervous balance to the 

flower of the population, is unable to bear the strain of his 

life, and is said to be worn out in twenty-five years. It is 

equally foolish to submit the finest flowers of girlhood to a 

strain which is admittedly too severe. 

 

It seems to be clear that the main factor in the common sexual and general 

invalidism of girls and young women is bad hygiene, in the first place 

consisting in neglect of the menstrual functions and in the second place 

in faulty habits generally. In all the more essential matters that concern 

the hygiene of the body the traditions of girls--and this seems to be more 

especially the case in the Anglo-Saxon countries--are inferior to those of 

youths. Women are much more inclined than men to subordinate these things 

to what seems to them some more urgent interest or fancy of the moment; 

they are trained to wear awkward and constricting garments, they are 

indifferent to regular and substantial meals, preferring innutritious and 

indigestible foods and drinks; they are apt to disregard the demands of 

the bowels and the bladder out of laziness or modesty; they are even 


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