Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

who have been naturally and wholesomely brought up. At a later age, during 

adolescence, there is doubtless great advantage in the plan, now 

frequently adopted, especially in Germany, of giving lectures, addresses, 

or quiet talks to young people of each sex separately. The speaker is 

usually a specially selected teacher, a doctor or other qualified person 

who may be brought in for this special purpose. 

 

Stanley Hall, after remarking that sexual education should be 

chiefly from fathers to sons and from mothers to daughters, adds: 

"It may be that in the future this kind of initiation will again 

become an art, and experts will tell us with more confidence how 

to do our duty to the manifold exigencies, types and stages of 

youth, and instead of feeling baffled and defeated, we shall see 

that this age and theme is the supreme opening for the highest 

pedagogy to do its best and most transforming work, as well as 

being the greatest of all opportunities for the teacher of 

religion" (Stanley Hall, _Adolescence_, vol. i, p. 469). "At 

Williams College, Harvard, Johns Hopkins and Clark," the same 

distinguished teacher observes (ib., p. 465), "I have made it a 

duty in my departmental teaching to speak very briefly, but 

plainly to young men under my instruction, personally if I deemed 

it wise, and often, though here only in general terms, before 

student bodies, and I believe I have nowhere done more good, but 

it is a painful duty. It requires tact and some degree of hard 

and strenuous common sense rather than technical knowledge." 

 

It is scarcely necessary to say that the ordinary teacher of 

either sex is quite incompetent to speak of sexual hygiene. It is 

a task to which all, or some, teachers must be trained. A 

beginning in this direction has been made in Germany by the 

delivery to teachers of courses of lectures on sexual hygiene in 

education. In Prussia the first attempt was made in Breslau when 

the central school authorities requested Dr. Martin Chotzen to 

deliver such a course to one hundred and fifty teachers who took 

the greatest interest in the lectures, which covered the anatomy 

of the sexual organs, the development of the sexual instinct, its 

chief perversions, venereal diseases, and the importance of the 

cultivation of self-control. In _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_ 

(Bd. i, Heft 7) Dr. Fritz Reuther gives the substance of lectures 

which he has delivered to a class of young teachers; they cover 

much the same ground as Chotzen's. 

 

There is no evidence that in England the Minister of Education 

has yet taken any steps to insure the delivery of lectures on 

sexual hygiene to the pupils who are about to leave school. In 

Prussia, however, the Ministry of Education has taken an active 

interest in this matter, and such lectures are beginning to be 

commonly delivered, though attendance at them is not usually 

obligatory. Some years ago (in 1900), when it was proposed to 

deliver a series of lectures on sexual hygiene to the advanced 

pupils in Berlin schools, under the auspices of a society for the 

improvement of morals, the municipal authorities withdrew their 

permission to use the classrooms, on the ground that "such 

lectures would be extremely dangerous to the moral sense of an 

audience of the young." The same objection has been made by 

municipal officials in France. In Germany, at all events, 

however, opinion is rapidly growing more enlightened. In England 

little or no progress has yet been made, but in America steps are 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward