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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

being taken in this direction, as by the Chicago Society for 

Social Hygiene. It must, indeed, be said that those who oppose 

the sexual enlightenment of youth in large cities are directly 

allying themselves, whether or not they know it, with the 

influences that make for vice and immorality. 

 

Such lectures are also given to girls on leaving school, not only 

girls of the well-to-do, but also those of the poor class, who 

need them fully as much, and in some respects more. Thus Dr. A. 

Heidenhain has published a lecture (_Sexuelle Belehrung der aus 

den Volksschule entlassenen Maedchen_, 1907), accompanied by 

anatomical tables, which he has delivered to girls about to leave 

school, and which is intended to be put into their hands at this 

time. Salvat, in a Lyons thesis (_La Depopulation de la France_, 

1903), insists that the hygiene of pregnancy and the care of 

infants should form part of the subject of such lectures. These 

subjects might well be left, however, to a somewhat later period. 

 

Something is clearly needed beyond lectures on these matters. It should be 

the business of the parents or other guardians of every adolescent youth 

and girl to arrange that, once at least at this period of life, there 

should be a private, personal interview with a medical man to afford an 

opportunity for a friendly and confidential talk concerning the main 

points of sexual hygiene. The family doctor would be the best for this 

duty because he would be familiar with the personal temperament of the 

youth and the family tendencies.[37] In the case of girls a woman doctor 

would often be preferred. Sex is properly a mystery; and to the unspoilt 

youth, it is instinctively so; except in an abstract and technical form it 

cannot properly form the subject of lectures. In a private and 

individualized conversation between the novice in life and the expert, it 

is possible to say many necessary things that could not be said in public, 

and it is possible, moreover, for the youth to ask questions which shyness 

and reserve make it impossible to put to parents, while the convenient 

opportunity of putting them naturally to the expert otherwise seldom or 

never occurs. Most youths have their own special ignorances, their own 

special difficulties, difficulties and ignorances that could sometimes be 

resolved by a word. Yet it by no means infrequently happens that they 

carry them far on into adult life because they have lacked the 

opportunity, or the skill and assurance to create the opportunity, of 

obtaining enlightenment. 

 

It must be clearly understood that these talks are of medical, hygienic, 

and physiological character; they are not to be used for retailing moral 

platitudes. To make them that would be a fatal mistake. The young are 

often very hostile to merely conventional moral maxims, and suspect their 

hollowness, not always without reason. The end to be aimed at here is 

enlightenment. Certainly knowledge can never be immoral, but nothing is 

gained by jumbling up knowledge and morality together. 

 

In emphasizing the nature of the physician's task in this matter as purely 

and simply that of wise practical enlightenment, nothing is implied 

against the advantages, and indeed the immense value in sexual hygiene, of 

the moral, religious, ideal elements of life. It is not the primary 

business of the physician to inspire these, but they have a very intimate 

relation with the sexual life, and every boy and girl at puberty, and 

never before puberty, should be granted the privilege--and not the duty or 


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