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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

baser instincts. Early familiarity with nudity in art is at the same time 

an aid to the attainment of a proper attitude towards purity in nature. 

"He who has once learnt," as Hoeller remarks, "to enjoy peacefully 

nakedness in art, will be able to look on nakedness in nature as on a work 

of art." 

 

Casts of classic nude statues and reproductions of the pictures 

of the old Venetian and other Italian masters may fittingly be 

used to adorn schoolrooms, not so much as objects of instruction 

as things of beauty with which the child cannot too early become 

familiarized. In Italy it is said to be usual for school classes 

to be taken by their teachers to the art museums with good 

results; such visits form part of the official scheme of 

education. 

 

There can be no doubt that such early familiarity with the beauty 

of nudity in classic art is widely needed among all social 

classes and in many countries. It is to this defect of our 

education that we must attribute the occasional, and indeed in 

America and England frequent, occurrence of such incidents as 

petitions and protests against the exhibition of nude statuary in 

art museums, the display of pictures so inoffensive as Leighton's 

"Bath of Psyche" in shop windows, and the demand for the draping 

of the naked personifications of abstract virtues in 

architectural street decoration. So imperfect is still the 

education of the multitude that in these matters the ill-bred 

fanatic of pruriency usually gains his will. Such a state of 

things cannot but have an unwholesome reaction on the moral 

atmosphere of the community in which it is possible. Even from 

the religious point of view, prurient prudery is not justifiable. 

Northcote has very temperately and sensibly discussed the 

question of the nude in art from the standpoint of Christian 

morality. He points out that not only is the nude in art not to 

be condemned without qualification, and that the nude is by no 

means necessarily the erotic, but he also adds that even erotic 

art, in its best and purest manifestations, only arouses emotions 

that are the legitimate object of man's aspirations. It would be 

impossible even to represent Biblical stories adequately on 

canvas or in marble if erotic art were to be tabooed (Rev. H. 

Northcote, _Christianity and Sex Problems_, Ch. XIV). 

 

Early familiarity with the nude in classic and early Italian art 

should be combined at puberty with an equal familiarity with 

photographs of beautiful and naturally developed nude models. In 

former years books containing such pictures in a suitable and 

attractive manner to place before the young were difficult to 

procure. Now this difficulty no longer exists. Dr. C.H. Stratz, 

of The Hague, has been the pioneer in this matter, and in a 

series of beautiful books (notably in _Der Koerper des Kindes, Die 

Schoenheit des Weiblichen Koerpers_ and _Die Rassenschoenheit des 

Weibes_, all published by Enke in Stuttgart), he has brought 

together a large number of admirably selected photographs of nude 

but entirely chaste figures. More recently Dr. Shufeldt, of 

Washington (who dedicates his work to Stratz), has published his 

_Studies of the Human Form_ in which, in the same spirit, he has 

brought together the results of his own studies of the naked 

human form during many years. It is necessary to correct the 

impressions received from classic sources by good photographic 

illustrations on account of the false conventions prevailing in 


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