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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

classic works, though those conventions were not necessarily 

false for the artists who originated them. The omission of the 

pudendal hair, in representations of the nude was, for instance, 

quite natural for the people of countries still under Oriental 

influence are accustomed to remove the hair from the body. If, 

however, under quite different conditions, we perpetuate that 

artistic convention to-day, we put ourselves into a perverse 

relation to nature. There is ample evidence of this. "There is 

one convention so ancient, so necessary, so universal," writes 

Mr. Frederic Harrison (_Nineteenth Century and After_, Aug., 

1907), "that its deliberate defiance to-day may arouse the bile 

of the least squeamish of men and should make women withdraw at 

once." If boys and girls were brought up at their mother's knees 

in familiarity with pictures of beautiful and natural nakedness, 

it would be impossible for anyone to write such silly and 

shameful words as these. 

 

There can be no doubt that among ourselves the simple and direct 

attitude of the child towards nakedness is so early crushed out 

of him that intelligent education is necessary in order that he 

may be enabled to discern what is and what is not obscene. To the 

plough-boy and the country servant-girl all nakedness, including 

that of Greek statuary, is alike shameful or lustful. "I have a 

picture of women like that," said a countryman with a grin, as he 

pointed to a photograph of one of Tintoret's most beautiful 

groups, "smoking cigarettes." And the mass of people in most 

northern countries have still passed little beyond this stage of 

discernment; in ability to distinguish between the beautiful and 

the obscene they are still on the level of the plough-boy and the 

servant-girl. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[18] These manifestations have been dealt with in the study of Autoerotism 

in vol. i of the present _Studies_. It may be added that the sexual life 

of the child has been exhaustively investigated by Moll, _Das Sexualleben 

des Kindes_, 1909. 

 

[19] This genital efflorescence in the sexual glands and breasts at birth 

or in early infancy has been discussed in a Paris thesis, by Camille 

Renouf (_La Crise Genital et les Manifestations Connexes chez le Foetus et 

le Nouveau-ne_, 1905); he is unable to offer a satisfactory explanation of 

these phenomena. 

 

[20] Amelineau, _La Morale des Egyptiens_, p. 64. 

 

[21] "The Social Evil in Philadelphia," _Arena_, March, 1896. 

 

[22] Moll, _Kontraere Sexualempfindung_, third edition, p. 592. 

 

[23] This powerlessness of the law and the police is well recognized by 

lawyers familiar with the matter. Thus F. Werthauer (_Sittlichkeitsdelikte 

der Grosstadt_, 1907) insists throughout on the importance of parents and 

teachers imparting to children from their early years a progressively 

increasing knowledge of sexual matters. 

 

[24] "Parents must be taught how to impart information," remarks E.L. 

Keyes ("Education upon Sexual Matters," _New York Medical Journal_, Feb. 

10, 1906), "and this teaching of the parent should begin when he is 

himself a child." 

 

[25] Moll (op. cit., p. 224) argues well how impossible it is to preserve 

children from sights and influence connected with the sexual life. 

 

[26] Girls are not even prepared, in many cases, for the appearance of the 

pubic hair. This unexpected growth of hair frequently causes young girls 

much secret worry, and often they carefully cut it off. 

 

[27] G.S. Hall, _Adolescence_, vol. i, p. 511. Many years ago, in 1875, 


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