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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

was not along these lines that Man was destined to emerge. Among all the 

mammal predecessors of Man, the male is an imposing and important figure 

in the early days of courtship, but after conception has once been secured 

the mother plays the chief part in the racial life. The male must be 

content to forage abroad and stand on guard when at home in the 

ante-chamber of the family. When she has once been impregnated the female 

animal angrily rejects the caresses she had welcomed so coquettishly 

before, and even in Man the place of the father at the birth of his child 

is not a notably dignified or comfortable one. Nature accords the male but 

a secondary and comparatively humble place in the home, the breeding-place 

of the race; he may compensate himself if he will, by seeking adventure 

and renown in the world outside. The mother is the child's supreme parent, 

and during the period from conception to birth the hygiene of the future 

man can only be affected by influences which work through her. 

 

Fundamental and elementary as is the fact of the predominant position of 

the mother in relation to the life of the race, incontestable as it must 

seem to all those who have traversed the volumes of these _Studies_ up to 

the present point, it must be admitted that it has sometimes been 

forgotten or ignored. In the great ages of humanity it has indeed been 

accepted as a central and sacred fact. In classic Rome at one period the 

house of the pregnant woman was adorned with garlands, and in Athens it 

was an inviolable sanctuary where even the criminal might find shelter. 

Even amid the mixed influences of the exuberantly vital times which 

preceded the outburst of the Renaissance, the ideally beautiful woman, as 

pictures still show, was the pregnant woman. But it has not always been 

so. At the present time, for instance, there can be no doubt that we are 

but beginning to emerge from a period during which this fact was often 

disputed and denied, both in theory and in practice, even by women 

themselves. This was notably the case both in England and America, and it 

is probably owing in large part to the unfortunate infatuation which led 

women in these lands to follow after masculine ideals that at the present 

moment the inspirations of progress in women's movements come mainly 

to-day from the women of other lands. Motherhood and the future of the 

race were systematically belittled. Paternity is but a mere incident, it 

was argued, in man's life: why should maternity be more than a mere 

incident in woman's life? In England, by a curiously perverted form of 

sexual attraction, women were so fascinated by the glamour that surrounded 

men that they desired to suppress or forget all the facts of organic 

constitution which made them unlike men, counting their glory as their 

shame, and sought the same education as men, the same occupations as men, 

even the same sports. As we know, there was at the origin an element of 

rightness in this impulse.[2] It was absolutely right in so far as it was 

a claim for freedom from artificial restriction, and a demand for economic 

independence. But it became mischievous and absurd when it developed into 

a passion for doing, in all respects, the same things as men do; how 

mischievous and how absurd we may realize if we imagine men developing a 

passion to imitate the ways and avocations of women. Freedom is only good 

when it is a freedom to follow the laws of one's own nature; it ceases to 

be freedom when it becomes a slavish attempt to imitate others, and would 

be disastrous if it could be successful.[3] 

 

At the present day this movement on the theoretical side has ceased to 


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