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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

possess any representatives who exert serious influence. Yet its practical 

results are still prominently exhibited in England and the other countries 

in which it has been felt. Infantile mortality is enormous, and in England 

at all events is only beginning to show a tendency to diminish; motherhood 

is without dignity, and the vitality of mothers is speedily crushed, so 

that often they cannot so much as suckle their infants; ignorant 

girl-mothers give their infants potatoes and gin; on every hand we are 

told of the evidence of degeneracy in the race, or if not in the race, at 

all events, in the young individuals of to-day. 

 

It would be out of place, and would lead us too far, to discuss 

here these various practical outcomes of the foolish attempt to 

belittle the immense racial importance of motherhood. It is 

enough here to touch on the one point of the excess of infantile 

mortality. 

 

In England--which is not from the social point of view in a very 

much worse condition than most countries, for in Austria and 

Russia the infant mortality is higher still, though in Australia 

and New Zealand much lower, but still excessive--more than 

one-fourth of the total number of deaths every year is of infants 

under one year of age. In the opinion of medical officers of 

health who are in the best position to form an opinion, about 

one-half of this mortality, roughly speaking, is absolutely 

preventable. Moreover, it is doubtful whether there is any real 

movement of decrease in this mortality; during the past half 

century it has sometimes slightly risen and sometimes slightly 

fallen, and though during the past few years the general movement 

of mortality for children under five in England and Wales has 

shown a tendency to decrease, in London (according to J.F.J. 

Sykes, although Sir Shirley Murphy has attempted to minimize the 

significance of these figures) the infantile mortality rate for 

the first three months of life actually rose from 69 per 1,000 in 

the period 1888-1892 to 75 per 1,000 in the period 1898-1901. 

(This refers, it must be remembered, to the period before the 

introduction of the Notification of Births Act.) In any case, 

although the general mortality shows a marked tendency to 

improvement there is certainly no adequately corresponding 

improvement in the infantile mortality. This is scarcely 

surprising, when we realize that there has been no change for the 

better, but rather for the worse, in the conditions under which 

our infants are born and reared. Thus William Hall, who has had 

an intimate knowledge extending over fifty-six years of the slums 

of Leeds, and has weighed and measured many thousands of slum 

children, besides examining over 120,000 boys and girls as to 

their fitness for factory labor, states (_British Medical 

Journal_, October 14, 1905) that "fifty years ago the slum mother 

was much more sober, cleanly, domestic, and motherly than she is 

to-day; she was herself better nourished and she almost always 

suckled her children, and after weaning they received more 

nutritious bone-making food, and she was able to prepare more 

wholesome food at home." The system of compulsory education has 

had an unfortunate influence in exerting a strain on the parents 

and worsening the conditions of the home. For, excellent as 

education is in itself, it is not the primary need of life, and 

has been made compulsory before the more essential things of life 

have been made equally compulsory. How absolutely unnecessary 


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