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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

this great mortality is may be shown, without evoking the good 

example of Australia and New Zealand, by merely comparing small 

English towns; thus while in Guildford the infantile death rate 

is 65 per thousand, in Burslem it is 205 per thousand. 

 

It is sometimes said that infantile mortality is an economic 

question, and that with improvement in wages it would cease. This 

is only true to a limited extent and under certain conditions. In 

Australia there is no grinding poverty, but the deaths of infants 

under one year of age are still between 80 and 90 per thousand, 

and one-third of this mortality, according to Hooper (_British 

Medical Journal_, 1908, vol. ii, p. 289), being due to the 

ignorance of mothers and the dislike to suckling, is easily 

preventable. The employment of married women greatly diminishes 

the poverty of a family, but nothing can be worse for the welfare 

of the woman as mother, or for the welfare of her child. Reid, 

the medical officer of health for Staffordshire, where there are 

two large centres of artisan population with identical health 

conditions, has shown that in the northern centre, where a very 

large number of women are engaged in factories, still-births are 

three times as frequent as in the southern centre, where there 

are practically no trade employments for women; the frequency of 

abnormalities is also in the same ratio. The superiority of 

Jewish over Christian children, again, and their lower infantile 

mortality, seem to be entirely due to the fact that Jewesses are 

better mothers. "The Jewish children in the slums," says William 

Hall (_British Medical Journal_, October 14, 1905), speaking from 

wide and accurate knowledge, "were superior in weight, in teeth, 

and in general bodily development, and they seemed less 

susceptible to infectious disease. Yet these Jews were 

overcrowded, they took little exercise, and their unsanitary 

environment was obvious. The fact was, their children were much 

better nourished. The pregnant Jewess was more cared for, and no 

doubt supplied better nutriment to the foetus. After the children 

were born 90 per cent. received breast-milk, and during later 

childhood they were abundantly fed on bone-making material; eggs 

and oil, fish, fresh vegetables, and fruit entered largely into 

their diet." G. Newman, in his important and comprehensive book 

on _Infant Mortality_, emphasizes the conclusion that "first of 

all we need a higher standard of physical motherhood." The 

problem of infantile mortality, he declares (page 259), is not 

one of sanitation alone, or housing, or indeed of poverty as 

such, "_but is mainly a question of motherhood_." 

 

The fundamental need of the pregnant woman is _rest_. Without a large 

degree of maternal rest there can be no puericulture.[4] The task of 

creating a man needs the whole of a woman's best energies, more especially 

during the three months before birth. It cannot be subordinated to the tax 

on strength involved by manual or mental labor, or even strenuous social 

duties and amusements. The numerous experiments and observations which 

have been made during recent years in Maternity Hospitals, more especially 

in France, have shown conclusively that not only the present and future 

well-being of the mother and the ease of her confinement, but the fate of 

the child, are immensely influenced by rest during the last month of 

pregnancy. "Every working woman is entitled to rest during the last three 

months of her pregnancy." This formula was adopted by the International 


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