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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

of the passions, from the age of twenty-five to thirty-five or 

forty that men are capable of the greatest efforts of virtue or 

of genius." "What touches sex," wrote Zola, "touches the centre 

of social life." Even our regard for the praise and blame of 

others has a sexual origin, Professor Thomas argues 

(_Psychological Review_, Jan., 1904, pp. 61-67), and it is love 

which is the source of susceptibility generally and of the 

altruistic side of life. "The appearance of sex," Professor Woods 

Hutchinson attempts to show ("Love as a Factor in Evolution," 

_Monist_, 1898), "the development of maleness and femaleness, was 

not only the birthplace of affection, the well-spring of all 

morality, but an enormous economic advantage to the race and an 

absolute necessity of progress. In it first we find any conscious 

longing for or active impulse toward a fellow creature." "Were 

man robbed of the instinct of procreation, and of all that 

spiritually springs therefrom," exclaimed Maudsley in his 

_Physiology of Mind_, "that moment would all poetry, and perhaps 

also his whole moral sense, be obliterated from his life." "One 

seems to oneself transfigured, stronger, richer, more complete; 

one _is_ more complete," says Nietzsche (_Der Wille zur Macht_, 

p. 389), "we find here art as an organic function: we find it 

inlaid in the most angelic instinct of 'love:' we find it as the 

greatest stimulant of life.... It is not merely that it changes 

the feeling of values: the lover _is_ worth more, is stronger. In 

animals this condition produces new weapons, pigments, colors, 

and forms, above all new movements, new rhythms, a new seductive 

music. It is not otherwise in man.... Even in art the door is 

opened to him. If we subtract from lyrical work in words and 

sounds the suggestions of that intestinal fever, what is left 

over in poetry and music? _L'Art pour l'art_ perhaps, the 

quacking virtuosity of cold frogs who perish in their marsh. All 

the rest is created by love." 

 

It would be easy to multiply citations tending to show how many 

diverse thinkers have come to the conclusion that sexual love 

(including therewith parental and especially maternal love) is 

the source of the chief manifestations of life. How far they are 

justified in that conclusion, it is not our business now to 

inquire. 

 

It is undoubtedly true that, as we have seen when discussing the erratic 

and imperfect distribution of the conception of love, and even of words 

for love, over the world, by no means all people are equally apt for 

experiencing, even at any time in their lives, the emotions of sexual 

exaltation. The difference between the knight and the churl still 

subsists, and both may sometimes be found in all social strata. Even the 

refinements of sexual enjoyment, it is unnecessary to insist, quite 

commonly remain on a merely physical basis, and have little effect on the 

intellectual and emotional nature.[68] But this is not the case with the 

people who have most powerfully influenced the course of the world's 

thought and feeling. The personal reality of love, its importance for the 

individual life, are facts that have been testified to by some of the 

greatest thinkers, after lives devoted to the attainment of intellectual 

labor. The experience of Renan, who toward the end of his life set down in 

his remarkable drama _L'Abbesse de Jouarre_, his conviction that, even 

from the point of view of chastity, love is, after all, the supreme thing 


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