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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

in the world, is far from standing alone. "Love has always appeared as an 

inferior mode of human music, ambition as the superior mode," wrote Tarde, 

the distinguished sociologist, at the end of his life. "But will it always 

be thus? Are there not reasons for thinking that the future perhaps 

reserves for us the ineffable surprise of an inversion of that secular 

order?" Laplace, half an hour before his death, took up a volume of his 

own _Mecanique Celeste_, and said: "All that is only trifles, there is 

nothing true but love." Comte, who had spent his life in building up a 

Positive Philosophy which should be absolutely real, found (as indeed it 

may be said the great English Positivist Mill also found) the culmination 

of all his ideals in a woman, who was, he said, Egeria and Beatrice and 

Laura in one, and he wrote: "There is nothing real in the world but love. 

One grows tired of thinking, and even of acting; one never grows tired of 

loving, nor of saying so. In the worst tortures of affection I have never 

ceased to feel that the essential of happiness is that the heart should be 

worthily filled--even with pain, yes, even with pain, the bitterest pain." 

And Sophie Kowalewsky, after intellectual achievements which have placed 

her among the most distinguished of her sex, pathetically wrote: "Why can 

no one love me? I could give more than most women, and yet the most 

insignificant women are loved and I am not." Love, they all seem to say, 

is the one thing that is supremely worth while. The greatest and most 

brilliant of the world's intellectual giants, in their moments of final 

insight, thus reach the habitual level of the humble and almost anonymous 

persons, cloistered from the world, who wrote _The Imitation of Christ_ or 

_The Letters of a Portuguese Nun_. And how many others! 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[45] _Meditationes Piissimae de Cognitione Humanae Conditionis_, Migne's 

_Patrologia_, vol. clxxiv, p. 489, cap. III, "De Dignitate Animae et 

Vilitate Corporis." It may be worth while to quote more at length the 

vigorous language of the original. "Si diligenter consideres quid per os 

et nares caeterosque corporis meatus egrediatur, vilius sterquilinum 

numquam vidisti.... Attende, homo, quid fuisti ante ortum, et quid es ab 

ortu usque ad occasum, atque quid eris post hanc vitam. Profecto fuit 

quand non eras: postea de vili materia factus, et vilissimo panno 

involutus, menstruali sanguine in utero materno fuisti nutritus, et tunica 

tua fuit pellis secundina. Nihil aliud est homo quam sperma fetidum, 

saccus stercorum, cibus vermium.... Quid superbis, pulvis et cinis, cujus 

conceptus cula, nasci miseria, vivere poena, mori angustia?" 

 

[46] See (in Mignes' edition) _S. Odonis abbatis Cluniacensis 

Collationes_, lib. ii, cap. IX. 

 

[47] Duehren (_Neue Forshungen ueber die Marquis de Sade_, pp. 432 et seq.) 

shows how the ascetic view of woman's body persisted, for instance, in 

Schopenhauer and De Sade. 

 

[48] In "The Evolution of Modesty," in the first volume of these 

_Studies_, and again in the fifth volume in discussing urolagnia in the 

study of "Erotic Symbolism," the mutual reactions of the sexual and 

excretory centres were fully dealt with. 

 

[49] "La Morale Sexuelle," _Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, Jan., 

1907. 

 

[50] The above passage, now slightly modified, originally formed an 

unpublished part of an essay on Walt Whitman in _The New Spirit_, first 

issued in 1889. 

 

[51] Even in the ninth century, however, when the monastic movement was 

rapidly developing, there were some who withstood the tendencies of the 

new ascetics. Thus, in 850, Ratramnus, the monk of Corbie, wrote a 


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