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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

physical efforts. I have not succeeded in any other way; that is 

all: when I brace myself up to burn myself I make my mind freer, 

lighter and more active for several days. Why do you speak of my 

desire for mortification? My parents believe that, but it is 

absurd. It would be a mortification if it brought any suffering, 

but I enjoy this suffering, it gives me back my mind; it prevents 

my thoughts from stopping: what would one not do to attain such 

happiness?" (P. Janet, "The Pathogenesis of Some Impulsions," 

_Journal of Abnormal Psychology_, April, 1906.) If we understand 

this psychological process we may realize how it is that even in 

the higher religions, however else they may differ, the practical 

value of asceticism and mortification as the necessary door to 

the most exalted religious state is almost universally 

recognized, and with complete cheerfulness. "Asceticism and 

ecstacy are inseparable," as Probst-Biraben remarks at the outset 

of an interesting paper on Mahommedan mysticism ("L'Extase dans 

le Mysticisme Musulman," _Revue Philosophique_, Nov., 1906). 

Asceticism is the necessary ante-chamber to spiritual perfection. 

 

It thus happens that savage peoples largely base their often admirable 

enforcement of asceticism not on the practical grounds that would justify 

it, but on religious grounds that with the growth of intelligence fall 

into discredit.[71] Even, however, when the scrupulous observances of 

savages, whether in sexual or in non-sexual matters, are without any 

obviously sound basis it cannot be said that they are entirely useless if 

they tend to encourage self-control and the sense of reverence.[72] The 

would-be intelligent and practical peoples who cast aside primitive 

observances because they seem baseless or even ridiculous, need a still 

finer practical sense and still greater intelligence in order to realize 

that, though the reasons for the observances have been wrong, yet the 

observances themselves may have been necessary methods of attaining 

personal and social efficiency. It constantly happens in the course of 

civilization that we have to revive old observances and furnish them with 

new reasons. 

 

In considering the moral quality of chastity among savages, we 

must carefully separate that chastity which among semi-primitive 

peoples is exclusively imposed upon women. This has no moral 

quality whatever, for it is not exercised as a useful discipline, 

but merely enforced in order to heighten the economic and erotic 

value of the women. Many authorities believe that the regard for 

women as property furnishes the true reason for the widespread 

insistence on virginity in brides. Thus A.B. Ellis, speaking of 

the West Coast of Africa (_Yoruba-Speaking Peoples_, pp. 183 _et 

seq._), says that girls of good class are betrothed as mere 

children, and are carefully guarded from men, while girls of 

lower class are seldom betrothed, and may lead any life they 

choose. "In this custom of infant or child betrothals we probably 

find the key to that curious regard for ante-nuptial chastity 

found not only among the tribes of the Gold and Slave Coasts, but 

also among many other uncivilized peoples in different parts of 

the world." In a very different part of the world, in Northern 

Siberia, "the Yakuts," Sieroshevski states (_Journal 

Anthropological Institute_, Jan.-June, 1901, p. 96), "see 

nothing immoral in illicit love, providing only that nobody 

suffers material loss by it. It is true that parents will scold a 


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