Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

the islands, the Tahitians have become the stock example of a 

population given over to licentiousness and all its awful 

results. Thus, in his valuable _Polynesian Researches_ (second 

edition, 1832, vol. i, Ch. IX) William Ellis says that the 

Tahitians practiced "the worst pollutions of which it was 

possible for man to be guilty," though not specifying them. When, 

however, we carefully examine the narratives of the early 

visitors to Tahiti, before the population became contaminated by 

contact with Europeans, it becomes clear that this view needs 

serious modification. "The great plenty of good and nourishing 

food," wrote an early explorer, J.R. Forster (_Observations Made 

on a Voyage Round the World_, 1778, pp. 231, 409, 422), "together 

with the fine climate, the beauty and unreserved behavior of 

their females, invite them powerfully to the enjoyments and 

pleasures of love. They begin very early to abandon themselves to 

the most libidinous scenes. Their songs, their dances, and 

dramatic performances, breathe a spirit of luxury." Yet he is 

over and over again impelled to set down facts which bear 

testimony to the virtues of these people. Though rather 

effeminate in build, they are athletic, he says. Moreover, in 

their wars they fight with great bravery and valor. They are, for 

the rest, hospitable. He remarks that they treat their married 

women with great respect, and that women generally are nearly the 

equals of men, both in intelligence and in social position; he 

gives a charming description of the women. "In short, their 

character," Forster concludes, "is as amiable as that of any 

nation that ever came unimproved out of the hands of Nature," and 

he remarks that, as was felt by the South Sea peoples generally, 

"whenever we came to this happy island we could evidently 

perceive the opulence and happiness of its inhabitants." It is 

noteworthy also, that, notwithstanding the high importance which 

the Tahitians attached to the erotic side of life, they were not 

deficient in regard for chastity. When Cook, who visited Tahiti 

many times, was among "this benevolent humane" people, he noted 

their esteem for chastity, and found that not only were betrothed 

girls strictly guarded before marriage, but that men also who had 

refrained from sexual intercourse for some time before marriage 

were believed to pass at death immediately into the abode of the 

blessed. "Their behavior, on all occasions, seems to indicate a 

great openness and generosity of disposition. I never saw them, 

in any misfortune, labor under the appearance of anxiety, after 

the critical moment was past. Neither does care ever seem to 

wrinkle their brow. On the contrary, even the approach of death 

does not appear to alter their usual vivacity" (_Third Voyage of 

Discovery_, 1776-1780). Turnbull visited Tahiti at a later period 

(_A Voyage Round the World in 1800_, etc., pp. 374-5), but while 

finding all sorts of vices among them, he is yet compelled to 

admit their virtues: "Their manner of addressing strangers, from 

the king to the meanest subject, is courteous and affable in the 

extreme.... They certainly live amongst each other in more 

harmony than is usual amongst Europeans. During the whole time I 

was amongst them I never saw such a thing as a battle.... I never 

remember to have seen an Otaheitean out of temper. They jest upon 

each other with greater freedom than the Europeans, but these 


Page 5 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   Forward