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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

attentions which the modern girls of his time required, and which these 

men delighted to expend on their virginal sweethearts whether in public or 

in private. He cannot help thinking, however, that the man who lavishes 

kisses and caresses on a woman whose virginity he retains is putting 

himself somewhat in the position of Tantalus. But this new refinement of 

tender chastity, which came as a delicious discovery to the early 

Christians who had resolutely thrust away the licentiousness of the pagan 

world, was deeply rooted, as we discover from the frequency with which the 

grave Fathers of the Church, apprehensive of scandal, felt called upon to 

reprove it, though their condemnation is sometimes not without a trace of 

secret sympathy.[75] 

 

There was one form in which the new Christian chastity flourished 

exuberantly and unchecked: it conquered literature. The most charming, 

and, we may be sure, the most popular literature of the early Church lay 

in the innumerable romances of erotic chastity--to some extent, it may 

well be, founded on fact--which are embodied to-day in the _Acta 

Sanctorum_. We can see in even the most simple and non-miraculous early 

Christian records of the martyrdom of women that the writers were fully 

aware of the delicate charm of the heroine who, like Perpetua at Carthage, 

tossed by wild cattle in the arena, rises to gather her torn garment 

around her and to put up her disheveled hair.[76] It was an easy step to 

the stories of romantic adventure. Among these delightful stories I may 

refer especially to the legend of Thekla, which has been placed, 

incorrectly it may be, as early as the first century, "The Bride and 

Bridegroom of India" in _Judas Thomas's Acts_, "The Virgin of Antioch" as 

narrated by St. Ambrose, the history of "Achilleus and Nereus," "Mygdonia 

and Karish," and "Two Lovers of Auvergne" as told by Gregory of Tours. 

Early Christian literature abounds in the stories of lovers who had indeed 

preserved their chastity, and had yet discovered the most exquisite 

secrets of love. 

 

Thekla's day is the twenty-third of September. There is a very 

good Syriac version (by Lipsius and others regarded as more 

primitive than the Greek version) of the _Acts of Paul and 

Thekla_ (see, e.g., Wright's _Apocryphal Acts_). These _Acts_ 

belong to the latter part of the second century. The story is 

that Thekla, refusing to yield to the passion of the high priest 

of Syria, was put, naked but for a girdle (_subligaculum_) into 

the arena on the back of a lioness, which licked her feet and 

fought for her against the other beasts, dying in her defense. 

The other beasts, however, did her no harm, and she was finally 

released. A queen loaded her with money, she modified her dress 

to look like a man, travelled to meet Paul, and lived to old age. 

Sir W.M. Ramsay has written an interesting study of these _Acts_ 

(_The Church in the Roman Empire_, Ch. XVI). He is of opinion 

that the _Acts_ are based on a first century document, and is 

able to disentangle many elements of truth from the story. He 

states that it is the only evidence we possess of the ideas and 

actions of women during the first century in Asia Minor, where 

their position was so high and their influence so great. Thekla 

represents the assertion of woman's rights, and she administered 

the rite of baptism, though in the existing versions of the 

_Acts_ these features are toned down or eliminated. 

 

 


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