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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

love, and am praying to my Lord that I may continue in this love 

which I have experienced this night. I am not veiled, because the 

veil of corruption is taken from me, and I am not ashamed, 

because the deed of shame has been removed far from me, and I am 

cheerful and gay, and despise this deed of corruption and the 

joys of this wedding-feast, because I am invited to the true 

wedding-feast. I have not had intercourse with a husband, the end 

whereof is bitter repentance, because I am betrothed to the true 

Husband." The bridegroom answered also in the same spirit, very 

naturally to the dismay of the King, who sent for the sorcerer 

whom he had asked to bless his unlucky daughter. But Judas Thomas 

had already left the city and at his inn the King's stewards 

found only the flute-player, sitting and weeping because he had 

not taken her with him. She was glad, however, when she heard 

what had happened, and hastened to the young couple, and lived 

with them ever afterwards. The King also was finally reconciled, 

and all ended chastely, but happily. 

 

In these same _Judas Thomas's Acts_, which are not later than the 

fourth century, we find (eighth act) the story of Mygdonia and 

Karish. Mygdonia, the wife of Karish, is converted by Thomas and 

flees from her husband, naked save for the curtain of the chamber 

door which she has wrapped around her, to her old nurse. With the 

nurse she goes to Thomas, who pours holy oil over her head, 

bidding the nurse to anoint her all over with it; then a cloth is 

put round her loins and he baptizes her; then she is clothed and 

he gives her the sacrament. The young rapture of chastity grows 

lyrical at times, and Judas Thomas breaks out: "Purity is the 

athlete who is not overcome. Purity is the truth that blencheth 

not. Purity is worthy before God of being to Him a familiar 

handmaiden. Purity is the messenger of concord which bringeth the 

tidings of peace." 

 

Another romance of chastity is furnished by the episode of 

Drusiana in _The History of the Apostles_ traditionally 

attributed to Abdias, Bishop of Babylon (Bk. v, Ch. IV, _et 

seq._). Drusiana is the wife of Andronicus, and is so pious that 

she will not have intercourse with him. The youth Callimachus 

falls madly in love with her, and his amorous attempts involve 

many exciting adventures, but the chastity of Drusiana is finally 

triumphant. 

 

A characteristic example of the literature we are here concerned 

with is St. Ambrose's story of "The Virgin in the Brothel" 

(narrated in his _De Virginibus_, Migne's edition of Ambrose's 

Works, vols. iii-iv, p. 211). A certain virgin, St. Ambrose tells 

us, who lately lived at Antioch, was condemned either to 

sacrifice to the gods or to go to the brothel. She chose the 

latter alternative. But the first man who came in to her was a 

Christian soldier who called her "sister," and bade her have no 

fear. He proposed that they should exchange clothes. This was 

done and she escaped, while the soldier was led away to death. At 

the place of execution, however, she ran up and exclaimed that it 

was not death she feared but shame. He, however, maintained that 

he had been condemned to death in her place. Finally the crown of 

martyrdom for which they contended was adjudged to both. 

 

We constantly observe in the early documents of this romantic 

literature of chastity that chastity is insisted on by no means 

chiefly because of its rewards after death, nor even because the 


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