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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

virgin who devotes herself to it secures in Christ an ever-young 

lover whose golden-haired beauty is sometimes emphasized. Its 

chief charm is represented as lying in its own joy and freedom 

and the security it involves from all the troubles, 

inconveniences and bondages of matrimony. This early Christian 

movement of romantic chastity was clearly, in large measure, a 

revolt of women against men and marriage. This is well brought 

out in the instructive story, supposed to be of third century 

origin, of the eunuchs Achilleus and Nereus, as narrated in the 

_Acta Sanctorum_, May 12th. Achilleus and Nereus were Christian 

eunuchs of the bedchamber to Domitia, a virgin of noble birth, 

related to the Emperor Domitian and betrothed to Aurelian, son 

of a Consul. One day, as their mistress was putting on her jewels 

and her purple garments embroidered with gold, they began in turn 

to talk to her about all the joys and advantages of virginity, as 

compared to marriage with a mere man. The conversation is 

developed at great length and with much eloquence. Domitia was 

finally persuaded. She suffered much from Aurelian in 

consequence, and when he obtained her banishment to an island she 

went thither with Achilleus and Nereus, who were put to death. 

Incidentally, the death of Felicula, another heroine of chastity, 

is described. When elevated on the rack because she would not 

marry, she constantly refused to deny Jesus, whom she called her 

lover. "Ego non nego amatorem meum!" 

 

A special department of this literature is concerned with stories 

of the conversions or the penitence of courtesans. St. 

Martinianus, for instance (Feb. 13), was tempted by the courtesan 

Zoe, but converted her. The story of St. Margaret of Cortona 

(Feb. 22), a penitent courtesan, is late, for she belongs to the 

thirteenth century. The most delightful document in this 

literature is probably the latest, the fourteenth century Italian 

devotional romance called _The Life of Saint Mary Magdalen_, 

commonly associated with the name of Frate Domenico Cavalca. (It 

has been translated into English). It is the delicately and 

deliciously told romance of the chaste and passionate love of the 

sweet sinner, Mary Magdalene, for her beloved Master. 

 

As time went on the insistence on the joys of chastity in this 

life became less marked, and chastity is more and more regarded 

as a state only to be fully rewarded in a future life. Even, 

however, in Gregory of Tours's charming story of "The Two Lovers 

of Auvergne," in which this attitude is clear, the pleasures of 

chaste love in this life are brought out as clearly as in any of 

the early romances (_Historia Francorum_, lib. i, cap. XLII). Two 

senators of Auvergne each had an only child, and they betrothed 

them to each other. When the wedding day came and the young 

couple were placed in bed, the bride turned to the wall and wept 

bitterly. The bridegroom implored her to tell him what was the 

matter, and, turning towards him, she said that if she were to 

weep all her days she could never wash away her grief for she had 

resolved to give her little body immaculate to Christ, untouched 

by men, and now instead of immortal roses she had only had on her 

brow faded roses, which deformed rather than adorned it, and 

instead of the dowry of Paradise which Christ had promised her 

she had become the consort of a merely mortal man. She deplored 

her sad fate at considerable length and with much gentle 


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