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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Bk. iii, Ch. IX). Elsewhere (op. cit., Bk. iii, Ch. XI) he 

attempts to answer the question: What sexual relations are 

essentially impure? and concludes that no answer is possible. 

"There appears to be no distinct principle, having any claim to 

self-evidence, upon which the question can be answered so as to 

command general assent." Even what is called "Free Love," he 

adds, "in so far as it is earnestly advocated as a means to a 

completer harmony of sentiment between men and women, cannot be 

condemned as impure, for it seems paradoxical to distinguish 

purity from impurity merely by less rapidity of transition." 

 

Moll, from the standpoint of medical psychology, reaches the same 

conclusion as Sidgwick from that of ethics. In a report on the 

"Value of Chastity for Men," published as an appendix to the 

third edition (1899) of his _Kontraere Sexualempfindung_, the 

distinguished Berlin physician discusses the matter with much 

vigorous common sense, insisting that "chaste and unchaste are 

_relative ideas_." We must not, he states, as is so often done, 

identify "chaste" with "sexually abstinent." He adds that we are 

not justified in describing all extra-marital sexual intercourse 

as unchaste, for, if we do so, we shall be compelled to regard 

nearly all men, and some very estimable women, as unchaste. He 

rightly insists that in this matter we must apply the same rule 

to women as to men, and he points out that even when it involves 

what may be technically adultery sexual intercourse is not 

necessarily unchaste. He takes the case of a girl who, at 

eighteen, when still mentally immature, is married to a man with 

whom she finds it impossible to live and a separation 

consequently occurs, although a divorce may be impossible to 

obtain. If she now falls passionately in love with a man her love 

may be entirely chaste, though it involves what is technically 

adultery. 

 

In thus understanding asceticism and chastity, and their beneficial 

functions in life, we see that they occupy a place midway between the 

artificially exaggerated position they once held and that to which they 

were degraded by the inevitable reaction of total indifference or actual 

hostility which followed. Asceticism and chastity are not rigid 

categorical imperatives; they are useful means to desirable ends; they are 

wise and beautiful arts. They demand our estimation, but not our 

over-estimation. For in over-estimating them, it is too often forgotten, 

we over-estimate the sexual instinct. The instinct of sex is indeed 

extremely important. Yet it has not that all-embracing and supereminent 

importance which some, even of those who fight against it, are accustomed 

to believe. That artificially magnified conception of the sexual impulse 

is fortified by the artificial emphasis placed upon asceticism. We may 

learn the real place of the sexual impulse in learning how we may 

reasonably and naturally view the restraints on that impulse. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[69] For Blake and for Shelley, as well as, it may be added, for Hinton, 

chastity, as Todhunter remarks in his _Study of Shelley_, is "a type of 

submission to the actual, a renunciation of the infinite, and is therefore 

hated by them. The chaste man, i.e., the man of prudence and self-control, 

is the man who has lost the nakedness of his primitive innocence." 

 

[70] For evidence of the practices of savages in this matter, see Appendix 

_A_ to the third volume of these _Studies_, "The Sexual Instinct in 

Savages." Cf. also Chs. IV and VII of Westermarck's _History of Human 


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