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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Marriage_, and also Chs. XXXVIII and XLI of the same author's _Origin and 

Development of the Moral Ideas_, vol. ii; Frazer's _Golden Bough_ contains 

much bearing on this subject, as also Crawley's _Mystic Rose_. 

 

[71] See, e.g., Westermarck, _Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas_, 

vol. ii, pp. 412 et seq. 

 

[72] Thus an old Maori declared, a few years ago, that the decline of his 

race has been entirely due to the loss of the ancient religious faith in 

the _tabu_. "For," said he (I quote from an Auckland newspaper), "in the 

olden-time our _tapu_ ramified the whole social system. The head, the 

hair, spots where apparitions appeared, places which the _tohungas_ 

proclaimed as sacred, we have forgotten and disregarded. Who nowadays 

thinks of the sacredness of the head? See when the kettle boils, the young 

man jumps up, whips the cap off his head, and uses it for a kettle-holder. 

Who nowadays but looks on with indifference when the barber of the 

village, if he be near the fire, shakes the loose hair off his cloth into 

it, and the joke and the laughter goes on as if no sacred operation had 

just been concluded. Food is consumed on places which, in bygone days, it 

dared not even be carried over." 

 

[73] Thus, long before Christian monks arose, the ascetic life of the 

cloister on very similar lines existed in Egypt in the worship of Serapis 

(Dill, _Roman Society_, p. 79). 

 

[74] At night, in the baptistry, with lamps dimly burning, the women were 

stripped even of their tunics, plunged three times in the pool, then 

anointed, dressed in white, and kissed. 

 

[75] Thus Jerome, in his letter to Eustochium, refers to those couples who 

"share the same room, often even the same bed, and call us suspicious if 

we draw any conclusions," while Cyprian (_Epistola_, 86) is unable to 

approve of those men he hears of, one a deacon, who live in familiar 

intercourse with virgins, even sleeping in the same bed with them, for, he 

declares, the feminine sex is weak and youth is wanton. 

 

[76] Perpetua (_Acta Sanctorum_, March 7) is termed by Hort and Mayor 

"that fairest flower in the garden of post-Apostolic Christendom." She was 

not, however, a virgin, but a young mother with a baby at her breast. 

 

[77] The strength of early Christian asceticism lay in its spontaneous and 

voluntary character. When, in the ninth century, the Carlovingians 

attempted to enforce monastic and clerical celibacy, the result was a 

great outburst of unchastity and crime; nunneries became brothels, nuns 

were frequently guilty of infanticide, monks committed unspeakable 

abominations, the regular clergy formed incestuous relations with their 

nearest female relatives (Lea, _History of Sacerdotal Celibacy_, vol. i, 

pp, 155 et seq.). 

 

[78] Senancour, _De l'Amour_, vol. ii, p. 233. Islam has placed much less 

stress on chastity than Christianity, but practically, it would appear, 

there is often more regard for chastity under Mohammedan rule than under 

Christian rule. Thus it is stated by "Viator" (_Fortnightly Review_, Dec., 

1908) that formerly, under Turkish Moslem rule, it was impossible to buy 

the virtue of women in Bosnia, but that now, under the Christian rule of 

Austria, it is everywhere possible to buy women near the Austrian 

frontier. 

 

[79] The basis of this feeling was strengthened when it was shown by 

scholars that the physical virtue of "virginity" had been masquerading 

under a false name. To remain a virgin seems to have meant at the first, 

among peoples of early Aryan culture, by no means to take a vow of 

chastity, but to refuse to submit to the yoke of patriarchal marriage. The 


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