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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

dignity of the sexual relationship. If a man made sexual advances to a 

woman outside marriage, and thus brought her within the despised circle of 

"lust," he was injuring her because he was impairing her religious and 

moral value.[92] The only way he could repair the damage done was by 

paying her money or by entering into a forced and therefore probably 

unfortunate marriage with her. That is to say that sexual relationships 

were, by the ecclesiastical traditions, placed on a pecuniary basis, on 

the same level as prostitution. By its well-meant intentions to support 

the theological morality which had developed on an ascetic basis, the 

Church was thus really undermining even that form of sexual relationship 

which it sanctified. 

 

Gregory the Great ordered that the seducer of a virgin shall 

marry her, or, in case of refusal, be severely punished 

corporally and shut up in a monastery to perform penance. 

According to other ecclesiastical rules, the seducer of a virgin, 

though held to no responsibility by the civil forum, was required 

to marry her, or to find a husband and furnish a dowry for her. 

Such rules had their good side, and were especially equitable 

when seduction had been accomplished by deceit. But they largely 

tended in practice to subordinate all questions of sexual 

morality to a money question. The reparation to the woman, also, 

largely became necessary because the ecclesiastical conception of 

lust caused her value to be depreciated by contact with lust, and 

the reparation might be said to constitute a part of penance. 

Aquinas held that lust, in however slight a degree, is a mortal 

sin, and most of the more influential theologians took a view 

nearly or quite as rigid. Some, however, held that a certain 

degree of delectation is possible in these matters without mortal 

sin, or asserted, for instance, that to feel the touch of a soft 

and warm hand is not mortal sin so long as no sexual feeling is 

thereby aroused. Others, however, held that such distinctions are 

impossible, and that all pleasures of this kind are sinful. Tomas 

Sanchez endeavored at much length to establish rules for the 

complicated problems of delectation that thus arose, but he was 

constrained to admit that no rules are really possible, and that 

such matters must be left to the judgment of a prudent man. At 

that point casuistry dissolves and the modern point of view 

emerges (see, e.g., Lea, _History of Auricular Confession_, vol. 

ii, pp. 57, 115, 246, etc.). 

 

Even to-day the influence of the old traditions of the Church still 

unconsciously survives among us. That is inevitable as regards religious 

teachers, but it is found also in men of science, even in Protestant 

countries. The result is that quite contradictory dogmas are found side by 

side, even in the same writer. On the one hand, the manifestations of the 

sexual impulse are emphatically condemned as both unnecessary and evil; on 

the other hand, marriage, which is fundamentally (whatever else it may 

also be) a manifestation of the sexual impulse, receives equally emphatic 

approval as the only proper and moral form of living.[93] There can be no 

reasonable doubt whatever that it is to the surviving and pervading 

influence of the ancient traditional theological conception of _libido_ 

that we must largely attribute the sharp difference of opinions among 

physicians on the question of sexual abstinence and the otherwise 

unnecessary acrimony with which these opinions have sometimes been stated. 

 

On the one side, we find the emphatic statement that sexual intercourse is 


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