Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

necessary and that health cannot be maintained unless the sexual 

activities are regularly exercised. 

 

"All parts of the body which are developed for a definite use are kept in 

health, and in the enjoyment of fair growth and of long youth, by the 

fulfilment of that use, and by their appropriate exercise in the 

employment to which they are accustomed." In that statement, which occurs 

in the great Hippocratic treatise "On the Joints," we have the classic 

expression of the doctrine which in ever varying forms has been taught by 

all those who have protested against sexual abstinence. When we come down 

to the sixteenth century outbreak of Protestantism we find that Luther's 

revolt against Catholicism was in part a protest against the teaching of 

sexual abstinence. "He to whom the gift of continence is not given," he 

said in his _Table Talk_, "will not become chaste by fasting and vigils. 

For my own part I was not excessively tormented [though elsewhere he 

speaks of the great fires of lust by which he had been troubled], but all 

the same the more I macerated myself the more I burnt." And three hundred 

years later, Bebel, the would-be nineteenth century Luther of a different 

Protestantism, took the same attitude towards sexual abstinence, while 

Hinton the physician and philosopher, living in a land of rigid sexual 

conventionalism and prudery, and moved by keen sympathy for the sufferings 

he saw around him, would break into passionate sarcasm when confronted by 

the doctrine of sexual abstinence. "There are innumerable ills--terrible 

destructions, madness even, the ruin of lives--for which the embrace of 

man and woman would be a remedy. No one thinks of questioning it. 

Terrible evils and a remedy in a delight and joy! And man has chosen so to 

muddle his life that he must say: 'There, that would be a remedy, but I 

cannot use it. I _must be virtuous!_'" 

 

If we confine ourselves to modern times and to fairly precise 

medical statements, we find in Schurig's _Spermatologia_ (1720, 

pp. 274 et seq.), not only a discussion of the advantages of 

moderate sexual intercourse in a number of disorders, as 

witnessed by famous authorities, but also a list of 

results--including anorexia, insanity, impotence, epilepsy, even 

death--which were believed to have been due to sexual abstinence. 

This extreme view of the possible evils of sexual abstinence 

seems to have been part of the Renaissance traditions of medicine 

stiffened by a certain opposition between religion and science. 

It was still rigorously stated by Lallemand early in the 

nineteenth century. Subsequently, the medical statements of the 

evil results of sexual abstinence became more temperate and 

measured, though still often pronounced. Thus Gyurkovechky 

believes that these results may be as serious as those of sexual 

excess. Krafft-Ebing showed that sexual abstinence could produce 

a state of general nervous excitement (_Jahrbuch fuer 

Psychiatrie_, Bd. viii, Heft 1 and 2). Schrenck-Notzing regards 

sexual abstinence as a cause of extreme sexual hyperaesthesia and 

of various perversions (in a chapter on sexual abstinence in his 

_Kriminalpsychologische und Psychopathologische Studien_, 1902, 

pp. 174-178). He records in illustration the case of a man of 

thirty-six who had masturbated in moderation as a boy, but 

abandoned the practice entirely, on moral grounds, twenty years 

ago, and has never had sexual intercourse, feeling proud to enter 

marriage a chaste man, but now for years has suffered greatly 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward