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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

lost their sacred and inspiring character, the idea was fostered by 

Christianity that such things were immoral.[107] Yet Christianity was 

itself in its origin an orgy of the higher spiritual activities released 

from the uncongenial servitude of classic civilization, a great festival 

of the poor and the humble, of the slave and the sinner. And when, with 

the necessity for orderly social organization, Christianity had ceased to 

be this it still recognized, as Paganism had done, the need for an 

occasional orgy. It appears that in 743 at a Synod held in Hainault 

reference was made to the February debauch (_de Spurcalibus in februario_) 

as a pagan practice; yet it was precisely this pagan festival which was 

embodied in the accepted customs of the Christian Church as the chief orgy 

of the ecclesiastical year, the great Carnival prefixed to the long fast 

of Lent. The celebration on Shrove Tuesday and the previous Sunday 

constituted a Christian Bacchanalian festival in which all classes joined. 

The greatest freedom and activity of physical movement was encouraged; 

"some go about naked without shame, some crawl on all fours, some on 

stilts, some imitate animals."[108] As time went on the Carnival lost its 

most strongly marked Bacchanalian features, but it still retains its 

essential character as a permitted and temporary relaxation of the tension 

of customary restraints and conventions. The Mediaeval Feast of Fools--a 

New Year's Revel well established by the twelfth century, mainly in 

France--presented an expressive picture of a Christian orgy in its extreme 

form, for here the most sacred ceremonies of the Church became the subject 

of fantastic parody. The Church, according to Nietzsche's saying, like all 

wise legislators, recognized that where great impulses and habits have to 

be cultivated, intercalary days must be appointed in which these impulses 

and habits may be denied, and so learn to hunger anew.[109] The clergy 

took the leading part in these folk-festivals, for to the men of that age, 

as Meray remarks, "the temple offered the complete notes of the human 

gamut; they found there the teaching of all duties, the consolation of all 

sorrows, the satisfaction of all joys. The sacred festivals of mediaeval 

Christianity were not a survival from Roman times; they leapt from the 

very heart of Christian society."[110] But, as Meray admits, all great and 

vigorous peoples, of the East and the West, have found it necessary 

sometimes to play with their sacred things. 

 

Among the Greeks and Romans this need is everywhere visible, not only in 

their comedy and their literature generally, but in everyday life. As 

Nietzsche truly remarks (in his _Geburt der Tragoedie_) the Greeks 

recognized all natural impulses, even those that are seemingly unworthy, 

and safeguarded them from working mischief by providing channels into 

which, on special days and in special rites, the surplus of wild energy 

might harmlessly flow. Plutarch, the last and most influential of the 

Greek moralists, well says, when advocating festivals (in his essay "On 

the Training of Children"), that "even in bows and harps we loosen their 

strings that we may bend and wind them up again." Seneca, perhaps the most 

influential of Roman if not of European moralists, even recommended 

occasional drunkenness. "Sometimes," he wrote in his _De Tranquillilate_, 

"we ought to come even to the point of intoxication, not for the purpose 

of drowning ourselves but of sinking ourselves deep in wine. For it washes 

away cares and raises our spirits from the lowest depths. The inventor of 

wine is called _Liber_ because he frees the soul from the servitude of 


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