Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

cavalry officer and supported by him, during the illness of the 

officer accidentally met a man whom she had formerly known, and 

once or twice invited him to see her, receiving from him presents 

in money. This somehow came to the knowledge of the police, and 

she was arrested and sentenced to one day's imprisonment as an 

unregistered prostitute. On appeal, however, the sentence was 

annulled. Liszt, in his _Strafrecht_, lays it down that a girl 

who obtains whole or part of her income from "fixed 

relationships" is not practicing unchastity for gain in the sense 

of the German law (_Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, Jahrgang 1, 

Heft 9, p. 345). 

 

It is not altogether easy to explain the origin of the systematized 

professional prostitution with the existence of which we are familiar in 

civilization. The amateur kind of prostitution which has sometimes been 

noted among primitive peoples--the fact, that is, that a man may give a 

woman a present in seeking to persuade her to allow him to have 

intercourse with her--is really not prostitution as we understand it. The 

present in such a case is merely part of a kind of courtship leading to a 

temporary relationship. The woman more or less retains her social position 

and is not forced to make an avocation of selling herself because 

henceforth no other career is possible to her. When Cook came to New 

Zealand his men found that the women were not impregnable, "but the terms 

and manner of compliance were as decent as those in marriage among us," 

and according "to their notions the agreement was as innocent." The 

consent of the woman's friends was necessary, and when the preliminaries 

were settled it was also necessary to treat this "Juliet of a night" with 

"the same delicacy as is here required with the wife for life, and the 

lover who presumed to take any liberties by which this was violated was 

sure to be disappointed."[127] In some of the Melanesian Islands, it is 

said that women would sometimes become prostitutes, or on account of their 

bad conduct be forced to become prostitutes for a time; they were not, 

however, particularly despised, and when they had in this way accumulated 

a certain amount of property they could marry well, after which it would 

not be proper to refer to their former career.[128] 

 

When prostitution first arises among a primitive people it sometimes 

happens that little or no stigma is attached to it for the reason that the 

community has not yet become accustomed to attach any special value to the 

presence of virginity. Schurtz quotes from the old Arabic geographer 

Al-Bekri some interesting remarks about the Slavs: "The women of the 

Slavs, after they have married, are faithful to their husbands. If, 

however, a young girl falls in love with a man she goes to him and 

satisfies her passion. And if a man marries and finds his wife a virgin he 

says to her: 'If you were worth anything men would have loved you, and you 

would have chosen one who would have taken away your virginity.' Then he 

drives her away and renounces her." It is a feeling of this kind which, 

among some peoples, leads a girl to be proud of the presents she has 

received from her lovers and to preserve them as a dowry for her marriage, 

knowing that her value will thus be still further heightened. Even among 

the Southern Slavs of modern Europe, who have preserved much of the 

primitive sexual freedom, this freedom, as Krauss, who has minutely 

studied the manners and customs of these peoples, declares, is 

fundamentally different from vice, licentiousness, or immodesty.[129] 


Page 2 from 5:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   Forward