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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

was probably long regarded by the laity as an exercise of more 

than common virtue, and rewarded with a tribute of mixed wonder, 

reverence, and pity, not unlike that which in some parts of the 

world is still paid to women who seek to honor their Creator in a 

different way by renouncing the natural functions of their sex 

and the tenderest relations of humanity" (J.G. Frazer, _Adonis, 

Attis, Osiris_, 1907, pp. 23 et seq.). 

 

It is difficult to resist the conclusion that this theory 

represents the central and primitive idea which led to the 

development of sacred prostitution. It seems equally clear, 

however, that as time went on, and especially as temple cults 

developed and priestly influence increased, this fundamental and 

primitive idea tended to become modified, and even transformed. 

The primitive conception became specialized in the belief that 

religious benefits, and especially the gift of fruitfulness, were 

gained _by the worshipper_, who thus sought the goddess's favor 

by an act of unchastity which might be presumed to be agreeable 

to an unchaste deity. The rite of Mylitta, as described by 

Herodotus, was a late development of this kind in an ancient 

civilization, and the benefit sought was evidently for the 

worshipper herself. This has been pointed out by Dr. Westermarck, 

who remarks that the words spoken to the woman by her partner as 

he gives her the coin--"May the goddess be auspicious to 

thee!"--themselves indicate that the object of the act was to 

insure her fertility, and he refers also to the fact that 

strangers frequently had a semi-supernatural character, and their 

benefits a specially efficacious character (Westermarck, _Origin 

and Development of the Moral Ideas_, vol. ii, p. 446). It may be 

added that the rite of Mylitta thus became analogous with another 

Mediterranean rite, in which the act of simulating intercourse 

with the representative of a god, or his image, ensured a woman's 

fertility. This is the rite practiced by the Egyptians of Mendes, 

in which a woman went through the ceremony of simulated 

intercourse with the sacred goat, regarded as the representative 

of a deity of Pan-like character (Herodotus, Bk. ii, Ch. XLVI; 

and see Dulaure, _Des Divinites Generatrices_, Ch. II; cf. vol. v 

of these _Studies_, "Erotic Symbolism," Sect. IV). This rite was 

maintained by Roman women, in connection with the statues of 

Priapus, to a very much later date, and St. Augustine mentions 

how Roman matrons placed the young bride on the erect member of 

Priapus (_De Civitate Dei_, Bk. iii, Ch. IX). The idea evidently 

running through this whole group of phenomena is that the deity, 

or the representative or even mere image of the deity, is able, 

through a real or simulated act of intercourse, to confer on the 

worshipper a portion of its own exalted generative activity. 

 

 

 

 


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