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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

less than 50 scudi from those to whom she was willing to accord 

what Montaigne called the "negotiation entiere." 

 

In regard to this matter it may be mentioned that, as stated by 

Bandello, it was the custom for a Venetian prostitute to have six 

or seven gentlemen at a time as her lovers. Each was entitled to 

come to sup and sleep with her on one night of the week, leaving 

her days free. They paid her so much per month, but she always 

definitely reserved the right to receive a stranger passing 

through Venice, if she wished, changing the time of her 

appointment with her lover for the night. The high and special 

prices which we find recorded are, of course, those demanded from 

the casual distinguished stranger who came to Venice as, once in 

the sixteenth century, Montaigne came. 

 

In 1580 (when not more than thirty-four) Veronica confessed to 

the Holy Office that she had had six children. In the same year 

she formed the design of founding a home, which should not be a 

monastery, where prostitutes who wished to abandon their mode of 

life could find a refuge with their children, if they had any. 

This seems to have led to the establishment of a Casa del 

Soccorso. In 1591 she died of fever, reconciled with God and 

blessed by many unfortunates. She had a good heart and a sound 

intellect, and was the last of the great Renaissance courtesans 

who revived Greek hetairism (Graf, _Attraverso il Cinquecento_, 

pp. 217-351). Even in sixteenth century Venice, however, it will 

be seen, Veronica Franco seems to have been not altogether at 

peace in the career of a courtesan. She was clearly not adapted 

for ordinary marriage, yet under the most favorable conditions 

that the modern world has ever offered it may still be doubted 

whether a prostitute's career can offer complete satisfaction to 

a woman of large heart and brain. 

 


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