Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

in many forgotten novels written by the women of that time--ideas 

were beginning to emerge in the feminine sphere. She was the 

first, and doubtless, from one point of view, the most extreme 

representative of a small and distinguished group of French women 

among whom Georges Sand is the finest personality. 

 

Thus it is idle to attempt to adorn the history of prostitution 

with the name of Ninon de Lenclos. A debauched old prostitute 

would never, like Ninon towards the end of her long life, have 

been able to retain or to conquer the affection and the esteem 

of many of the best men and women of her time; even to the 

austere Saint-Simon it seemed that there reigned in her little 

court a decorum which the greatest princesses cannot achieve. She 

was not a prostitute, but a woman of unique personality with a 

little streak of genius in it. That she was inimitable we need 

not perhaps greatly regret. In her old age, in 1699, her old 

friend and former lover, Saint-Evremond, wrote to her, with only 

a little exaggeration, that there were few princesses and few 

saints who would not leave their courts and their cloisters to 

change places with her. "If I had known beforehand what my life 

would be I would have hanged myself," was her oft-quoted answer. 

It is, indeed, a solitary phrase that slips in, perhaps as the 

expression of a momentary mood; one may make too much of it. More 

truly characteristic is the fine saying in which her Epicurean 

philosophy seems to stretch out towards Nietzsche: "La joie de 

l'esprit en marque la force." 

 

The frank acceptance of prostitution by the spiritual or even the temporal 

power has since the Renaissance become more and more exceptional. The 

opposite extreme of attempting to uproot prostitution has also in practice 

been altogether abandoned. Sporadic attempts have indeed been made, here 

and there, to put down prostitution with a strong hand even in quite 

modern times. It is now, however, realized that in such a case the remedy 

is worse than the disease. 

 

In 1860 a Mayor of Portsmouth felt it his duty to attempt to 

suppress prostitution. "In the early part of his mayoralty," 

according to a witness before the Select Committee on the 

Contagious Diseases Acts (p. 393), "there was an order passed 

that every beerhouse-keeper and licensed victualer in the borough 

known to harbor these women would be dealt with, and probably 

lose his license. On a given day about three hundred or four 

hundred of these forlorn outcasts were bundled wholesale into the 

streets, and they formed up in a large body, many of them with 

only a shift and a petticoat on, and with a lot of drunken men 

and boys with a fife and fiddle they paraded the streets for 

several days. They marched in a body to the workhouse, but for 

many reasons they were refused admittance.... These women 

wandered about for two or three days shelterless, and it was felt 

that the remedy was very much worse than the disease, and the 

women were allowed to go back to their former places." 

 

Similar experiments have been made even more recently in America. 

"In Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1891, the houses of prostitutes 

were closed, the inmates turned out upon the streets, and were 

refused lodging and even food by the citizens of that place. A 

wave of popular remonstrance, all over the country, at the 

outrage on humanity, created a reaction which resulted in a last 

condition by no means better than the first." In the same year 


Page 2 from 6:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   Forward