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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

also a similar incident occurred in New York with the same 

unfortunate results (Isidore Dyer, "The Municipal Control of 

Prostitution in the United States," report presented to the 

Brussels International Conference in 1899). 

 

There grew up instead the tendency to regulate prostitution, to give it a 

semi-official toleration which enabled the authorities to exercise a 

control over it, and to guard as far as possible against its evil by 

medical and police inspection. The new brothel system differed from the 

ancient mediaeval houses of prostitution in important respects; it involved 

a routine of medical inspection and it endeavored to suppress any rivalry 

by unlicensed prostitutes outside. Bernard Mandeville, the author of the 

_Fable of the Bees_, and an acute thinker, was a pioneer in the advocacy 

of this system. In 1724, in his _Modest Defense of Publick Stews_, he 

argues that "the encouraging of public whoring will not only prevent most 

of the mischievous effects of this vice, but even lessen the quantity of 

whoring in general, and reduce it to the narrowest bounds which it can 

possibly be contained in." He proposed to discourage private prostitution 

by giving special privileges and immunities to brothels by Act of 

Parliament. His scheme involved the erection of one hundred brothels in a 

special quarter of the city, to contain two thousand prostitutes and one 

hundred matrons of ability and experience with physicians and surgeons, as 

well as commissioners to oversee the whole. Mandeville was regarded merely 

as a cynic or worse, and his scheme was ignored or treated with contempt. 

It was left to the genius of Napoleon, eighty years later, to establish 

the system of "maisons de tolerance," which had so great an influence over 

modern European practice during a large part of the last century and even 

still in its numerous survivals forms the subject of widely divergent 

opinions. 

 

On the whole, however, it must be said that the system of registering, 

examining, and regularizing prostitutes now belongs to the past. Many 

great battles have been fought over this question; the most important is 

that which raged for many years in England over the Contagious Diseases 

Acts, and is embodied in the 600 pages of a Report by a Select Committee 

on these Acts issued in 1882. The majority of the members of the Committee 

reported favorably to the Acts which were, notwithstanding, repealed in 

1886, since which date no serious attempt has been made in England to 

establish them again. 

 

At the present time, although the old system still stands in many 

countries with the inert stolidity of established institutions, it no 

longer commands general approval. As Paul and Victor Margueritte have 

truly stated, in the course of an acute examination of the phenomena of 

state-regulated prostitution as found in Paris, the system is "barbarous 

to start with and almost inefficacious as well." The expert is every day 

more clearly demonstrating its inefficacy while the psychologist and the 

sociologist are constantly becoming more convinced that it is barbarous. 

 

It can indeed by no means be said that any unanimity has been attained. It 

is obviously so urgently necessary to combat the flood of disease and 

misery which proceeds directly from the spread of syphilis and gonorrhoea, 

and indirectly from the prostitution which is the chief propagator of 

these diseases, that we cannot be surprised that many should eagerly catch 

at any system which seems to promise a palliation of the evils. At the 

present time, however, it is those best acquainted with the operation of 


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