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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

without hesitation, that not more than 1 per cent, of the women I 

have known could be regarded as educated. This indicates that 

almost invariably they are of humble origin, and the terrible 

cases of overcrowding that are daily brought to light suggest 

that at very early ages the sense of modesty becomes extinct, and 

long before puberty a familiarity with things sexual takes place. 

As soon as they are old enough these girls are seduced by their 

sweethearts; the familiarity with which they regard sexual 

matters removes the restraint which surrounds a girl whose early 

life has been spent in decent surroundings. Later they go to work 

in factories and shops; if pretty and attractive, they consort 

with managers and foremen. Then the love of finery, which forms 

so large a part of the feminine character, tempts the girl to 

become the 'kept' woman of some man of means. A remarkable thing 

in this connection is the fact that they rarely enjoy excitement 

with their protectors, preferring rather the coarser embraces of 

some man nearer their own station in life, very often a soldier. 

I have not known many women who were seduced and deserted, though 

this is a fiction much affected by prostitutes. Barmaids supply a 

considerable number to the ranks of prostitution, largely on 

account of their addiction to drink; drunkenness invariably leads 

to laxness of moral restraint in women. Another potent factor in 

the production of prostitutes lies in the flare of finery 

flaunted by some friend who has adopted the life. A girl, working 

hard to live, sees some friend, perhaps making a call in the 

street where the hard-working girl lives, clothed in finery, 

while she herself can hardly get enough to eat. She has a 

conversation with her finely-clad friend who tells her how easily 

she can earn money, explaining what a vital asset the sexual 

organs are, and soon another one is added to the ranks." 

 

There is some interest in considering the reasons assigned for 

prostitutes entering their career. In some countries this has 

been estimated by those who come closely into official or other 

contact with prostitutes. In other countries, it is the rule for 

girls, before they are registered as prostitutes, to state the 

reasons for which they desire to enter the career. 

 

Parent-Duchatelet, whose work on prostitutes in Paris is still an 

authority, presented the first estimate of this kind. He found 

that of over five thousand prostitutes, 1441 were influenced by 

poverty, 1425 by seduction of lovers who had abandoned them, 

1255 by the loss of parents from death or other cause. By such an 

estimate, nearly the whole number are accounted for by 

wretchedness, that is by economic causes, alone 

(Parent-Duchatelet, _De la Prostitution_, 1857, vol. i, p. 107). 

 

In Brussels during a period of twenty years (1865-1884) 3505 

women were inscribed as prostitutes. The causes they assigned for 

desiring to take to this career present a different picture from 

that shown by Parent-Duchatelet, but perhaps a more reliable one, 

although there are some marked and curious discrepancies. Out of 

the 3505, 1523 explained that extreme poverty was the cause of 

their degradation; 1118 frankly confessed that their sexual 

passions were the cause; 420 attributed their fall to evil 

company; 316 said they were disgusted and weary of their work, 

because the toil was so arduous and the pay so small; 101 had 

been abandoned by their lovers; 10 had quarrelled with their 


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