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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

of moral imbecility--that is to say, a bluntness of perception 

for the ordinary moral considerations of civilization which, 

while it is largely due to the hardening influence of an 

unfavorable early environment, may also rest on a congenital 

predisposition--there can be no doubt that moral imbecility of 

slight degree is very frequently found among prostitutes. It 

would be plausible, doubtless, to say that every woman who gives 

her virginity in exchange for an inadequate return is an 

imbecile. If she gives herself for love, she has, at the worst, 

made a foolish mistake, such as the young and inexperienced may 

at any time make. But if she deliberately proposes to sell 

herself, and does so for nothing or next to nothing, the case is 

altered. The experiences of Commenge in Paris are instructive on 

this point. "For many young girls," he writes, "modesty has no 

existence, they experience no emotion in showing themselves 

completely undressed, they abandon themselves to any chance 

individual whom they will never see again. They attach no 

importance to their virginity; they are deflowered under the 

strangest conditions, without the least thought or care about the 

act they are accomplishing. No sentiment, no calculation, pushes 

them into a man's arms. They let themselves go without reflexion 

and without motive, in an almost animal manner, from indifference 

and without pleasure." He was acquainted with forty-five girls 

between the ages of twelve and seventeen who were deflowered by 

chance strangers whom they never met again; they lost their 

virginity, in Dumas's phrase, as they lost their milk-teeth, and 

could give no plausible account of the loss. A girl of fifteen, 

mentioned by Commenge, living with her parents who supplied all 

her wants, lost her virginity by casually meeting a man who 

offered her two francs if she would go with him; she did so 

without demur and soon begun to accost men on her own account. A 

girl of fourteen, also living comfortably with her parents, 

sacrificed her virginity at a fair in return for a glass of beer, 

and henceforth begun to associate with prostitutes. Another girl 

of the same age, at a local fete, wishing to go round on the 

hobby horse, spontaneously offered herself to the man directing 

the machinery for the pleasure of a ride. Yet another girl, of 

fifteen, at another fete, offered her virginity in return for the 

same momentary joy (Commenge, _Prostitution Clandestine_, 1897, 

pp. 101 et seq.). In the United States, Dr. W. Travis Gibb, 

examining physician to the New York Society for the Prevention of 

Cruelty to Children, bears similar testimony to the fact that in 

a fairly large proportion of "rape" cases the child is the 

willing victim. "It is horribly pathetic," he says (_Medical 

Record_, April 20, 1907), "to learn how far a nickel or a quarter 

will go towards purchasing the virtue of these children." 

 

In estimating the tendency of prostitutes to display congenital 

physical anomalies, the crudest and most obvious test, though not 

a precise or satisfactory one, is the general impression produced 

by the face. In France, when nearly 1000 prostitutes were divided 

into five groups from the point of view of their looks, only from 

seven to fourteen per cent, were found to belong to the first 

group, or that of those who could be said to possess youth and 

beauty (Jeannel, _De la Prostitution Publique_, 1860, p. 168). 

Woods Hutchinson, again, judging from an extensive acquaintance 


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