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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

married men (_Mutterschutz_, January, 1907, p. 45). 

 

Most authorities in most countries are of opinion that girls who 

eventually (usually between the ages of fifteen and twenty) 

become prostitutes have lost their virginity at an early age, and 

in the great majority of cases through men of their own class. 

"The girl of the people falls by the people," stated Reuss in 

France (_La Prostitution_, p. 41). "It is her like, workers like 

herself, who have the first fruits of her beauty and virginity. 

The man of the world who covers her with gold and jewels only has 

their leavings." Martineau, again (_De la Prostitution 

Clandestine_, 1885), showed that prostitutes are usually 

deflowered by men of their own class. And Jeannel, in Bordeaux, 

found reason for believing that it is not chiefly their masters 

who lead servants astray; they often go into service because they 

have been seduced in the country, while lazy, greedy, and 

unintelligent girls are sent from the country into the town to 

service. In Edinburgh, W. Tait (_Magdalenism_, 1842) found that 

soldiers more than any other class in the community are the 

seducers of women, the Highlanders being especially notorious in 

this respect. Soldiers have this reputation everywhere, and in 

Germany especially it is constantly found that the presence of 

the soldiery in a country district, as at the annual manoeuvres, 

is the cause of unchastity and illegitimate births; it is so also 

in Austria, where, long ago, Gross-Hoffinger stated that 

soldiers were responsible for at least a third of all 

illegitimate births, a share out of all proportion to their 

numbers. In Italy, Marro, investigating the occasion of the loss 

of virginity in twenty-two prostitutes, found that ten gave 

themselves more or less spontaneously to lovers or masters, ten 

yielded in the expectation of marriage, and two were outraged 

(_La Puberta_, p. 461). The loss of virginity, Marro adds, though 

it may not be the direct cause of prostitution, often leads on to 

it. "When a door has once been broken in," a prostitute said to 

him, "it is difficult to keep it closed." In Sardinia, as A. 

Mantegazza and Ciuffo found, prostitutes are very largely 

servants from the country who have already been deflowered by men 

of their own class. 

 

This civilizational factor of prostitution, the influence of luxury and 

excitement and refinement in attracting the girl of the people, as the 

flame attracts the moth, is indicated by the fact that it is the 

country-dwellers who chiefly succumb to the fascination. The girls whose 

adolescent explosive and orgiastic impulses, sometimes increased by a 

slight congenital lack of nervous balance, have been latent in the dull 

monotony of country life and heightened by the spectacle of luxury acting 

on the unrelieved drudgery of town life, find at last their complete 

gratification in the career of a prostitute. To the town girl, born and 

bred in the town, this career has not usually much attraction, unless she 

has been brought up from the first in an environment that predisposes her 

to adopt it. She is familiar from childhood with the excitements of urban 

civilization and they do not intoxicate her; she is, moreover, more shrewd 

to take care of herself than the country girl, and too well acquainted 

with the real facts of the prostitute's life to be very anxious to adopt 

her career. Beyond this, also, it is probable that the stocks she belongs 

to possess a native or acquired power of resistance to unbalancing 


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