Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Potton (Appendix to Parent-Duchatelet, vol. ii, p. 446) states 

that of nearly four thousand Lyons prostitutes only 376 belonged 

to Lyons. In Vienna, in 1873, Schrank remarks that of over 1500 

prostitutes only 615 were born in Vienna. The general rule, it 

will be seen, though the variations are wide, is that little more 

than a third of a city's prostitutes are children of the city. 

 

It is interesting to note that this tendency of the prostitute to 

reach cities from afar, this migratory tendency--which they 

nowadays share with waiters--is no merely modern phenomenon. 

"There are few cities in Lombardy, or France, or Gaul," wrote St. 

Boniface nearly twelve centuries ago, "in which there is not an 

adulteress or prostitute of the English nation," and the Saint 

attributes this to the custom of going on pilgrimage to foreign 

shrines. At the present time there is no marked English element 

among Continental prostitutes. Thus in Paris, according to Reuss 

(_La Prostitution_, p. 12), the foreign prostitutes in decreasing 

order are Belgian, German (Alsace-Lorraine), Swiss (especially 

Geneva), Italian, Spanish, and only then English. Connoisseurs in 

this matter say, indeed, that the English prostitute, as compared 

with her Continental (and especially French) sister, fails to 

show to advantage, being usually grasping as regards money and 

deficient in charm. 

 

It is the appeal of civilization, though not of what is finest and best in 

civilization, which more than any other motive, calls women to the career 

of a prostitute. It is now necessary to point out that for the man also, 

the same appeal makes itself felt in the person of the prostitute. The 

common and ignorant assumption that prostitution exists to satisfy the 

gross sensuality of the young unmarried man, and that if he is taught to 

bridle gross sexual impulse or induced to marry early the prostitute must 

be idle, is altogether incorrect. If all men married when quite young, not 

only would the remedy be worse than the disease--a point which it would be 

out of place to discuss here--but the remedy would not cure the disease. 

The prostitute is something more than a channel to drain off superfluous 

sexual energy, and her attraction by no means ceases when men are married, 

for a large number of the men who visit prostitutes, if not the majority, 

are married. And alike whether they are married or unmarried the motive 

is not one of uncomplicated lust. 

 

 


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