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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

occasional domestic quarrels soon healed by kisses; his love is 

witnessed by his jealousy, a jealousy which, as he admits, is 

quite unreasonable, for she is a faithful and devoted wife. Yet a 

few years after marriage, and in the midst of a life of strenuous 

official activity, Pepys cannot resist the temptation to seek the 

temporary favors of other women, seldom prostitutes, but nearly 

always women of low social class--shop women, workmen's wives, 

superior servant-girls. Often he is content to invite them to a 

quiet ale-house, and to take a few trivial liberties. Sometimes 

they absolutely refuse to allow more than this; when that happens 

he frequently thanks Almighty God (as he makes his entry in his 

_Diary_ at night) that he has been saved from temptation and from 

loss of time and money; in any case, he is apt to vow that it 

shall never occur again. It always does occur again. Pepys is 

quite sincere with himself; he makes no attempt at justification 

or excuse; he knows that he has yielded to a temptation; it is an 

impulse that comes over him at intervals, an impulse that he 

seems unable long to resist. Throughout it all he remains an 

estimable and diligent official, and in most respects a tolerably 

virtuous man, with a genuine dislike of loose people and loose 

talk. The attitude of Pepys is brought out with incomparable 

simplicity and sincerity because he is setting down these things 

for his own eyes only, but his case is substantially that of a 

vast number of other men, perhaps indeed of the typical _homme 

moyen sensuel_ (see Pepys, _Diary_, ed. Wheatley; e.g., vol. iv, 

passim). 

 

There is a third class of married men, less considerable in 

number but not unimportant, who are impelled to visit 

prostitutes: the class of sexually perverted men. There are a 

great many reasons why such men may desire to be married, and in 

some cases they marry women with whom they find it possible to 

obtain the particular form of sexual gratification they crave. 

But in a large proportion of cases this is not possible. The 

conventionally bred woman often cannot bring herself to humor 

even some quite innocent fetishistic whim of her husband's, for 

it is too alien to her feelings and too incomprehensible to her 

ideas, even though she may be genuinely in love with him; in many 

cases the husband would not venture to ask, and scarcely even 

wish, that his wife should lend herself to play the fantastic or 

possibly degrading part his desires demand. In such a case he 

turns naturally to the prostitute, the only woman whose business 

it is to fulfil his peculiar needs. Marriage has brought no 

relief to these men, and they constitute a noteworthy proportion 

of a prostitute's clients in every great city. The most ordinary 

prostitute of any experience can supply cases from among her own 

visitors to illustrate a treatise of psychopathic sexuality. It 

may suffice here to quote a passage from the confessions of a 

young London (Strand) prostitute as written down from her lips by 

a friend to whom I am indebted for the document; I have merely 

turned a few colloquial terms into more technical forms. After 

describing how, when she was still a child of thirteen in the 

country, a rich old gentleman would frequently come and exhibit 

himself before her and other girls, and was eventually arrested 

and imprisoned, she spoke of the perversities she had met with 

since she had become a prostitute. She knew a young man, about 


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