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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

fashions she finds "an aesthetic form of that instinct of destruction which 

seems peculiar to all pariah existences, in so far as they are not 

completely enslaved in spirit." 

 

"However surprising it may seem to some," a modern writer 

remarks, "prostitutes must be put on the same level as artists. 

Both use their gifts and talents for the joy and pleasure of 

others, and, as a rule, for payment. What is the essential 

difference between a singer who gives pleasure to hearers by her 

throat and a prostitute who gives pleasure to those who seek her 

by another part of her body? All art works on the senses." He 

refers to the significant fact that actors, and especially 

actresses, were formerly regarded much as prostitutes are now (R. 

Hellmann, _Ueber Geschlechtsfreiheit_, pp. 245-252). 

 

Bernaldo de Quiros and Llanas Aguilaniedo (_La Mala Vida en 

Madrid_, p. 242) trace the same influence still lower in the 

social scale. They are describing the more squalid kind of _cafe 

chantant_, in which, in Spain and elsewhere, the most vicious and 

degenerate feminine creatures become waitresses (and occasionally 

singers and dancers), playing the part of amiable and 

distinguished _hetairae_ to the public of carmen and shop-boys who 

frequent these resorts. "Dressed with what seems to the youth 

irreproachable taste, with hair elaborately prepared, and clean 

face adorned with flowers or trinkets, affable and at times 

haughty, superior in charm and in finery to the other women he is 

able to know, the waitresses become the most elevated example of 

the _femme galante_ whom he is able to contemplate and talk to, 

the courtesan of his sphere." 

 

But while to the simple, ignorant, and hungry youth the prostitute appeals 

as the embodiment of many of the refinements and perversities of 

civilization, on many more complex and civilized men she exerts an 

attraction of an almost reverse kind. She appeals by her fresh and natural 

coarseness, her frank familiarity with the crudest facts of life; and so 

lifts them for a moment out of the withering atmosphere of artificial 

thought and unreal sentiment in which so many civilized persons are 

compelled to spend the greater part of their lives. They feel in the words 

which the royal friend of a woman of this temperament is said to have used 

in explaining her incomprehensible influence over him: "She is so 

splendidly vulgar!" 

 

In illustration of this aspect of the appeal of prostitution, I 

may quote a passage in which the novelist, Hermant, in his 

_Confession d'un Enfant d'Hier_ (Lettre VII), has set down the 

reasons which may lead the super-refined child of a cultured age, 

yet by no means radically or completely vicious, to find 

satisfaction in commerce with prostitutes: "As long as my heart 

was not touched the object of my satisfaction was completely 

indifferent to me. I was, moreover, a great lover of absolute 

liberty, which is only possible in the circle of these anonymous 

creatures and in their reserved dwelling. There everything became 

permissible. With other women, however low we may seek them, 

certain convenances must be observed, a kind of protocol. To 

these one can say everything: one is protected by incognito and 

assured that nothing will be divulged. I profited by this 

freedom, which suited my age, but with a perverse fancy which was 

not characteristic of my years. I scarcely know where I found 

what I said to them, for it was the opposite of my tastes, which 


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