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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

were simple, and, if I may venture to say so, classic. It is true 

that, in matters of love, unrestrained naturalism always tends to 

perversion, a fact that can only seem paradoxical at first sight. 

Primitive peoples have many traits in common with degenerates. It 

was, however, only in words that I was unbridled; and that was 

the only occasion on which I can recollect seriously lying. But 

that necessity, which I then experienced, of expelling a lower 

depth of ignoble instincts, seems to me characteristic and 

humiliating. I may add that even in the midst of these 

dissipations I retained a certain reserve. The contacts to which 

I exposed myself failed to soil me; nothing was left when I had 

crossed the threshold. I have always retained, from that forcible 

and indifferent commerce, the habit of attributing no consequence 

to the action of the flesh. The amorous function, which religion 

and morality have surrounded with mystery or seasoned with sin, 

seems to me a function like any other, a little vile, but 

agreeable, and one to which the usual epilogue is too long.... 

This kind of companionship only lasted for a short time." This 

analysis of the attitude of a certain common type of civilized 

modern man seems to be just, but it may perhaps occur to some 

readers that a commerce which led to "the action of the flesh" 

being regarded as of no consequence can scarcely be said to have 

left no taint. 

 

In a somewhat similar manner, Henri de Regnier, in his novel, 

_Les Rencontres de Monsieur Breot_ (p. 50), represents Bercaille 

as deliberately preferring to take his pleasures with 

servant-girls rather than with ladies, for pleasure was, to his 

mind, a kind of service, which could well be accommodated with 

the services they are accustomed to give; and then they are 

robust and agreeable, they possess the _naivete_ which is always 

charming in the common people, and they are not apt to be 

repelled by those little accidents which might offend the 

fastidious sensibilities of delicately bred ladies. 

 

Bloch, who has especially emphasized this side of the appeal of 

prostitution (_Das Sexualleben unserer Zeit_, pp. 359-362), 

refers to the delicate and sensitive young Danish writer, J.P. 

Jakobsen, who seems to have acutely felt the contrast between the 

higher and more habitual impulses, and the occasional outburst of 

what he felt to be lower instincts; in his _Niels Lyhne_ he 

describes the kind of double life in which a man is true for a 

fortnight to the god he worships, and is then overcome by other 

powers which madly bear him in their grip towards what he feels 

to be humiliating, perverse, and filthy. "At such moments," Bloch 

remarks, "the man is another being. The 'two souls' in the breast 

become a reality. Is that the famous scholar, the lofty idealist, 

the fine-souled aesthetician, the artist who has given us so many 

splendid and pure works in poetry and painting? We no longer 

recognize him, for at such moments another being has come to the 

surface, another nature is moving within him, and with the power 

of an elementary force is impelling him towards things at which 

his 'upper consciousness,' the civilized man within him, would 

shudder." Bloch believes that we are here concerned with a kind 

of normal masculine masochism, which prostitution serves to 

gratify. 


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