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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

account of the physiological strain of work (Dluska, 

_Contribution a l'Etude de l'Allaitement Maternel_, These de 

Paris, 1894). Many statistics have been gathered in the German 

countries. Thus Wiedow (_Centralblatt fuer Gynaekologie_, No. 29, 

1895) found that of 525 women at the Freiburg Maternity only half 

could suckle thoroughly during the first two weeks; imperfect 

nipples were noted in 49 cases, and it was found that the 

development of the nipple bore a direct relation to the value of 

the breast as a secretory organ. At Munich Escherich and Bueller 

found that nearly 60 per cent. of women of the lower class were 

unable to suckle their children, and at Stuttgart three-quarters 

of the child-bearing women were in this condition. 

 

The reasons why children should be suckled at their mothers' breasts are 

larger than some may be inclined to believe. In the first place the 

psychological reason is one of no mean importance. The breast with its 

exquisitely sensitive nipple, vibrating in harmony with the sexual organs, 

furnishes the normal mechanism by which maternal love is developed. No 

doubt the woman who never suckles her child may love it, but such love is 

liable to remain defective on the fundamental and instinctive side. In 

some women, indeed, whom we may hesitate to call abnormal, maternal love 

fails to awaken at all until brought into action through this mechanism by 

the act of suckling. 

 

A more generally recognized and certainly fundamental reason for suckling 

the child is that the milk of the mother, provided she is reasonably 

healthy, is the infant's only ideally fit food. There are some people 

whose confidence in science leads them to believe that it is possible to 

manufacture foods that are as good or better than mother's milk; they 

fancy that the milk which is best for the calf is equally best for so 

different an animal as the baby. These are delusions. The infant's best 

food is that elaborated in his own mother's body. All other foods are more 

or less possible substitutes, which require trouble to prepare properly 

and are, moreover, exposed to various risks from which the mother's milk 

is free. 

 

A further reason, especially among the poor, against the use of any 

artificial foods is that it accustoms those around the child to try 

experiments with its feeding and to fancy that any kind of food they eat 

themselves may be good for the infant. It thus happens that bread and 

potatoes, brandy and gin, are thrust into infants' mouths. With the infant 

that is given the breast it is easier to make plain that, except by the 

doctor's orders, nothing else must be given. 

 

An additional reason why the mother should suckle her child is the close 

and frequent association with the child thus involved. Not only is the 

child better cared for in all respects, but the mother is not deprived of 

the discipline of such care, and is also enabled from the outset to learn 

and to understand the child's nature. 

 

The inability to suckle acquires great significance if we realize 

that it is associated, probably in a large measure as a direct 

cause, with infantile mortality. The mortality of 

artificially-fed infants during the first year of life is seldom 

less than double that of the breast-fed, sometimes it is as much 

as three times that of the breast-fed, or even more; thus at 

Derby 51.7 per cent. of hand-fed infants die under the age of 

twelve months, but only 8.6 per cent. of breast-fed infants. 

Those who survive are by no means free from suffering. At the end 


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