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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

of the first year they are found to weigh about 25 per cent. less 

than the breast-fed, and to be much shorter; they are more liable 

to tuberculosis and rickets, with all the evil results that flow 

from these diseases; and there is some reason to believe that the 

development of their teeth is injuriously affected. The 

degenerate character of the artificially-fed is well indicated by 

the fact that of 40,000 children who were brought for treatment 

to the Children's Hospital in Munich, 86 per cent. had been 

brought up by hand, and the few who had been suckled had usually 

only had the breast for a short time. The evil influence persists 

even up to adult life. In some parts of France where the 

wet-nurse industry flourishes so greatly that nearly all the 

children are brought up by hand, it has been found that the 

percentage of rejected conscripts is nearly double that for 

France generally. Corresponding results have been found by 

Friedjung in a large German athletic association. Among 155 

members, 65 per cent. were found on inquiry to have been 

breast-fed as infants (for an average of six months); but among 

the best athletes the percentage of breast-fed rose to 72 per 

cent. (for an average period of nine or ten months), while for 

the group of 56 who stood lowest in athletic power the percentage 

of breast-fed fell to 57 (for an average of only three months). 

 

The advantages for an infant of being suckled by its mother are 

greater than can be accounted for by the mere fact of being 

suckled rather than hand-fed. This has been shown by Vitrey (_De 

la Mortalite Infantile_, These de Lyon, 1907), who found from the 

statistics of the Hotel-Dieu at Lyons, that infants suckled by 

their mothers have a mortality of only 12 per cent., but if 

suckled by strangers, the mortality rises to 33 per cent. It may 

be added that, while suckling is essential to the complete 

well-being of the child, it is highly desirable for the sake of 

the mother's health also. (Some important statistics are 

summarized in a paper on "Infantile Mortality" in _British 

Medical Journal_, Nov. 2, 1907), while the various aspects of 

suckling have been thoroughly discussed by Bollinger, "Ueber 

Saeuglings-Sterblichkeit und die Erbliche functionelle Atrophie 

der menschlichen Milchdruese" (_Correspondenzblatt Deutschen 

Gesellschaft Anthropologie_, Oct., 1899). 

 

It appears that in Sweden, in the middle of the eighteenth 

century, it was a punishable offense for a woman to give her baby 

the bottle when she was able to suckle it. In recent years Prof. 

Anton von Menger, of Vienna, has argued (in his _Burgerliche 

Recht und die Besitzlosen Klassen_) that the future generation 

has the right to make this claim, and he proposes that every 

mother shall be legally bound to suckle her child unless her 

inability to do so has been certified by a physician. E.A. 

Schroeder (_Das Recht in der Geschlechtlichen Ordnung_, 1893, p. 

346) also argued that a mother should be legally bound to suckle 

her infant for at least nine months, unless solid grounds could 

be shown to the contrary, and this demand, which seems reasonable 

and natural, since it is a mother's privilege as well as her duty 

to suckle her infant when able to do so, has been insistently 

made by others also. It has been supported from the legal side by 

Weinberg (_Mutterschutz_, Sept., 1907). In France the Loi Roussel 

forbids a woman to act as a wet-nurse until her child is seven 


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