Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

months old, and this has had an excellent effect in lowering 

infantile mortality (A. Allee, _Puericulture et la Loi Roussel_, 

These de Paris, 1908). In some parts of Germany manufacturers are 

compelled to set up a suckling-room in the factory, where mothers 

can give the breast to the child in the intervals of work. The 

control and upkeep of these rooms, with provision of doctors and 

nurses, is undertaken by the municipality (_Sexual-Probleme_, 

Sept., 1908, p. 573). 

 

 

As things are to-day in modern industrial countries the righting of these 

wrongs cannot be left to Nature, that is, to the ignorant and untrained 

impulses of persons who live in a whirl of artificial life where the voice 

of instinct is drowned. The mother, we are accustomed to think, may be 

trusted to see to the welfare of her child, and it is unnecessary, or even 

"immoral," to come to her assistance. Yet there are few things, I think, 

more pathetic than the sight of a young Lancashire mother who works in the 

mills, when she has to stay at home to nurse her sick child. She is used 

to rise before day-break to go to the mill; she has scarcely seen her 

child by the light of the sun, she knows nothing of its necessities, the 

hands that are so skilful to catch the loom cannot soothe the child. The 

mother gazes down at it in vague, awkward, speechless misery. It is not a 

sight one can ever forget. 

 

It is France that is taking the lead in the initiation of the scientific 

and practical movements for the care of the young child before and after 

birth, and it is in France that we may find the germs of nearly all the 

methods now becoming adopted for arresting infantile mortality. The 

village system of Villiers-le-Duc, near Dijon in the Cote d'Or, has proved 

a germ of this fruitful kind. Here every pregnant woman not able to secure 

the right conditions for her own life and that of the child she is 

bearing, is able to claim the assistance of the village authorities; she 

is entitled, without payment, to the attendance of a doctor and midwife 

and to one franc a day during her confinement. The measures adopted in 

this village have practically abolished both maternal and infantile 

mortality. A few years ago Dr. Samson Moore, the medical officer of health 

for Huddersfield, heard of this village, and Mr. Benjamin Broadbent, the 

Mayor of Huddersfield, visited Villiers-le-Duc. It was resolved to 

initiate in Huddersfield a movement for combating infant mortality. 

Henceforth arose what is known as the Huddersfield scheme, a scheme which 

has been fruitful in splendid results. The points of the Huddersfield 

scheme are: (1) compulsory notification of births within forty-eight 

hours; (2) the appointment of lady assistant medical officers of help to 

visit the home, inquire, advise, and assist; (3) the organized aid of 

voluntary lady workers in subordination to the municipal part of the 

scheme; (4) appeal to the medical officer of help when the baby, not being 

under medical care, fails to thrive. The infantile mortality of 

Huddersfield has been very greatly reduced by this scheme.[16] 


Page 5 from 5:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]