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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

service, they are untouched by degradation. Nowadays, however, 

Indian "reformers," in the name of "civilization and science," 

seek to persuade the _muralis_ that they are "plunged in a career 

of degradation." No doubt in time the would-be moralists will 

drive the _muralis_ out of their temples and their homes, deprive 

them of all self-respect, and convert them into wretched 

outcasts, all in the cause of "science and civilization" (see, 

e.g., an article by Mrs. Kashibai Deodhar, _The New Reformer_, 

October, 1907). So it is that early reformers create for the 

reformers of a later day the task of humanizing prostitution 

afresh. 

 

There can be no doubt that this more humane conception of 

prostitution is to-day beginning to be realized in the actual 

civilized life of Europe. Thus in writing of prostitution in 

Paris, Dr. Robert Michels ("Erotische Streifzuege," 

_Mutterschutz_, 1906, Heft 9, p. 368) remarks: "While in Germany 

the prostitute is generally considered as an 'outcast' creature, 

and treated accordingly, an instrument of masculine lust to be 

used and thrown away, and whom one would under no circumstances 

recognize in public, in France the prostitute plays in many 

respects the part which once give significance and fame to the 

_hetairae_ of Athens." And after describing the consideration and 

respect which the Parisian prostitute is often able to require of 

her friends, and the non-sexual relation of comradeship which she 

can enter into with other men, the writer continues: "A girl who 

certainly yields herself for money, but by no means for the first 

comer's money, and who, in addition to her 'business friends,' 

feels the need of, so to say, non-sexual companions with whom she 

can associate in a free comrade-like way, and by whom she is 

treated and valued as a free human being, is not wholly lost for 

the moral worth of humanity." All prostitution is bad, Michels 

concludes, but we should have reason to congratulate ourselves if 

love-relationships of this Parisian species represented the 

lowest known form of extra-conjugal sexuality. (As bearing on the 

relative consideration accorded to prostitutes I may mention that 

a Paris prostitute remarked to a friend of mine that Englishmen 

would ask her questions which no Frenchman would venture to ask.) 

 

It is not, however, only in Paris, although here more markedly 

and prominently, that this humanizing change in prostitution is 

beginning to make itself felt. It is manifested, for instance, in 

the greater openness of a man's sexual life. "While he formerly 

slinked into a brothel in a remote street," Dr. Willy Hellpach 

remarks (_Nervositaet und Kultur_, p. 169), "he now walks abroad 

with his 'liaison,' visiting the theatres and cafes, without 

indeed any anxiety to meet his acquaintances, but with no 

embarrassment on that point. The thing is becoming more 

commonplace, more--natural." It is also, Hellpach proceeds to 

point out, thus becoming more moral also, and much unwholesome 

prudery and pruriency is being done away with. 

 

In England, where change is slow, this tendency to the 

humanization of prostitution may be less pronounced. But it 

certainly exists. In the middle of the last century Lecky wrote 

(_History of European Morals_, vol. ii, p. 285) that habitual 

prostitution "is in no other European country so hopelessly 

vicious or so irrevocable." That statement, which was also made 

by Parent-Duchatelet and other foreign observers, is fully 


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