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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

confirmed by the evidence on record. But it is a statement which 

would hardly be made to-day, except perhaps, in reference to 

special confined areas of our cities. It is the same in America, 

and we may doubtless find this tendency reflected in the report 

on _The Social Evil_ (1902), drawn up by a committee in New York, 

who gave it (p. 176) as one of their chief recommendations that 

prostitution should no longer be regarded as a crime, in which 

light, one gathers, it had formerly been regarded in New York. 

That may seem but a small step in the path of humanization, but 

it is in the right direction. 

 

It is by no means only in lands of European civilization that we 

may trace with developing culture the refinement and humanization 

of the slighter bonds of relationship with women. In Japan 

exactly the same demands led, several centuries ago, to the 

appearance of the geisha. In the course of an interesting and 

precise study of the geisha Mr. R.T. Farrer remarks (_Nineteenth 

Century_, April, 1904): "The geisha is in no sense necessarily a 

courtesan. She is a woman educated to attract; perfected from her 

childhood in all the intricacies of Japanese literature; 

practiced in wit and repartee; inured to the rapid give-and-take 

of conversation on every topic, human and divine. From her 

earliest youth she is broken into an inviolable charm of manner 

incomprehensible to the finest European, yet she is almost 

invariably a blossom of the lower classes, with dumpy claws, and 

squat, ugly nails. Her education, physical and moral, is far 

harder than that of the _ballerina_, and her success is achieved 

only after years of struggle and a bitter agony of torture.... 

And the geisha's social position may be compared with that of the 

European actress. The Geisha-house offers prizes as desirable as 

any of the Western stage. A great geisha with twenty nobles 

sitting round her, contending for her laughter, and kept in 

constant check by the flashing bodkin of her wit, holds a 

position no less high and famous than that of Sarah Bernhardt in 

her prime. She is equally sought, equally flattered, quite as 

madly adored, that quiet little elderly plain girl in dull blue. 

But she is prized thus primarily for her tongue, whose power only 

ripens fully as her physical charms decline. She demands vast 

sums for her owners, and even so often appears and dances only at 

her own pleasure. Few, if any, Westerners ever see a really 

famous geisha. She is too great to come before a European, except 

for an august or imperial command. Finally she may, and 

frequently does, marry into exalted places. In all this there is 

not the slightest necessity for any illicit relation." 


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