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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

more recently, from the scientific side, speaking especially as 

regards women, declares that knowledge is so indispensable for 

moral conduct that "ignorance must be counted the most immoral of 

acts" (_Essais Optimistes_, p. 420). 

 

The distinguished Belgian novelist, Camille Lemonnier, in his 

_L'Homme en Amour_, deals with the question of the sexual 

education of the young by presenting the history of a young man, 

brought up under the influence of the conventional and 

hypocritical views which teach that nudity and sex are shameful 

and disgusting things. In this way he passes by the opportunities 

of innocent and natural love, to become hopelessly enslaved at 

last to a sensual woman who treats him merely as the instrument 

of her pleasure, the last of a long succession of lovers. The 

book is a powerful plea for a sane, wholesome, and natural 

education in matters of sex. It was, however, prosecuted at 

Bruges, in 1901, though the trial finally ended in acquittal. 

Such a verdict is in harmony with the general tendency of feeling 

at the present time. 

 

The old ideas, expressed by Daudet, that the facts of sex are 

ugly and disillusioning, and that they shock the mind of the 

young, are both alike entirely false. As Canon Lyttelton remarks, 

in urging that the laws of the transmission of life should be 

taught to children by the mother: "The way they receive it with 

native reverence, truthfulness of understanding and guileless 

delicacy, is nothing short of a revelation of the never-ceasing 

beauty of nature. People sometimes speak of the indescribable 

beauty of children's innocence. But I venture to say that no one 

quite knows what it is who has foregone the privilege of being 

the first to set before them the true meaning of life and birth 

and the mystery of their own being. Not only do we fail to build 

up sound knowledge in them, but we put away from ourselves the 

chance of learning something that must be divine." In the same 

way, Edward Carpenter, stating that it is easy and natural for 

the child to learn from the first its physical relation to its 

mother, remarks (_Love's Coming of Age_, p. 9): "A child at the 

age of puberty, with the unfolding of its far-down emotional and 

sexual nature, is eminently capable of the most sensitive, 

affectional and serene appreciation of what _sex_ means 

(generally more so as things are to-day, than its worldling 

parent or guardian); and can absorb the teaching, if 

sympathetically given, without any shock or disturbance to its 

sense of shame--that sense which is so natural and valuable a 

safeguard of early youth." 

 

How widespread, even some years ago, had become the conviction 

that the sexual facts of life should be taught to girls as well 

as boys, was shown when the opinions of a very miscellaneous 

assortment of more or less prominent persons were sought on the 

question ("The Tree of Knowledge," _New Review_, June, 1894). A 

small minority of two only (Rabbi Adler and Mrs. Lynn Lynton) 

were against such knowledge, while among the majority in favor of 

it were Mme. Adam, Thomas Hardy, Sir Walter Besant, Bjoernson, 

Hall Caine, Sarah Grand, Nordau, Lady Henry Somerset, Baroness 

von Suttner, and Miss Willard. The leaders of the woman's 

movement are, of course, in favor of such knowledge. Thus a 

meeting of the Bund fuer Mutterschutz at Berlin, in 1905, almost 

unanimously passed a resolution declaring that the early sexual 

enlightenment of children in the facts of the sexual life is 


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