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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

urgently necessary (_Mutterschutz_, 1905, Heft 2, p. 91). It may 

be added that medical opinion has long approved of this 

enlightenment. Thus in England it was editorially stated in the 

_British Medical Journal_ some years ago (June 9, 1894): "Most 

medical men of an age to beget confidence in such affairs will be 

able to recall instances in which an ignorance, which would have 

been ludicrous if it had not been so sad, has been displayed on 

matters regarding which every woman entering on married life 

ought to have been accurately informed. There can, we think, be 

little doubt that much unhappiness and a great deal of illness 

would be prevented if young people of both sexes possessed a 

little accurate knowledge regarding the sexual relations, and 

were well impressed with the profound importance of selecting 

healthy mates. Knowledge need not necessarily be nasty, but even 

if it were, it certainly is not comparable in that respect with 

the imaginings of ignorance." In America, also, where at an 

annual meeting of the American Medical Association, Dr. Denslow 

Lewis, of Chicago, eloquently urged the need of teaching sexual 

hygiene to youths and girls, all the subsequent nine speakers, 

some of them physicians of worldwide fame, expressed their 

essential agreement (_Medico-Legal Journal_, June-Sept., 1903). 

Howard, again, at the end of his elaborate _History of 

Matrimonial Institutions_ (vol. iii, p. 257) asserts the 

necessity for education in matters of sex, as going to the root 

of the marriage problem. "In the future educational programme," 

he remarks, "sex questions must hold an honorable place." 

 

While, however, it is now widely recognized that children are entitled to 

sexual enlightenment, it cannot be said that this belief is widely put 

into practice. Many persons, who are fully persuaded that children should 

sooner or later be enlightened concerning the sexual sources of life, are 

somewhat nervously anxious as to the precise age at which this 

enlightenment should begin. Their latent feeling seems to be that sex is 

an evil, and enlightenment concerning sex also an evil, however necessary, 

and that the chief point is to ascertain the latest moment to which we can 

safely postpone this necessary evil. Such an attitude is, however, 

altogether wrong-headed. The child's desire for knowledge concerning the 

origin of himself is a perfectly natural, honest, and harmless desire, so 

long as it is not perverted by being thwarted. A child of four may ask 

questions on this matter, simply and spontaneously. As soon as the 

questions are put, certainly as soon as they become at all insistent, they 

should be answered, in the same simple and spontaneous spirit, truthfully, 

though according to the measure of the child's intelligence and his 

capacity and desire for knowledge. This period should not, and, if these 

indications are followed, naturally would not, in any case, be delayed 

beyond the sixth year. After that age even the most carefully guarded 

child is liable to contaminating communications from outside. Moll points 

out that the sexual enlightenment of girls in its various stages ought to 

be always a little ahead of that of boys, and as the development of girls 

up to the pubertal age is more precocious than that of boys, this demand 

is reasonable. 

 

If the elements of sexual education are to be imparted in early childhood, 

it is quite clear who ought to be the teacher. There should be no question 

that this privilege belongs by every right to the mother. Except where a 


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