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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

child is artificially separated from his chief parent it is indeed only 

the mother who has any natural opportunity of receiving and responding to 

these questions. It is unnecessary for her to take any initiative in the 

matter. The inevitable awakening of the child's intelligence and the 

evolution of his boundless curiosity furnish her love and skill with all 

opportunities for guiding her child's thoughts and knowledge. Nor is it 

necessary for her to possess the slightest technical information at this 

stage. It is only essential that she should have the most absolute faith 

in the purity and dignity of her physical relationship to her child, and 

be able to speak of it with frankness and tenderness. When that essential 

condition is fulfilled every mother has all the knowledge that her young 

child needs. 

 

Among the best authorities, both men and women, in all the 

countries where this matter is attracting attention, there seems 

now to be unanimity of opinion in favor of the elementary facts 

of the baby's relationship to its mother being explained to the 

child by the mother as soon as the child begins to ask questions. 

Thus in Germany Moll has repeatedly argued in this sense; he 

insists that sexual enlightenment should be mainly a private and 

individual matter; that in schools there should be no general and 

personal warnings about masturbation, etc. (though at a later age 

he approves of instruction in regard to venereal diseases), but 

that the mother is the proper person to impart intimate knowledge 

to the child, and that any age is suitable for the commencement 

of such enlightenment, provided it is put into a form fitted for 

the age (Moll, op. cit., p. 264). 

 

At the Mannheim meeting of the Congress of the German Society for 

Combating Venereal Disease, when the question of sexual 

enlightenment formed the sole subject of discussion, the opinion 

in favor of early teaching by the mother prevailed. "It is the 

mother who must, in the first place, be made responsible for the 

child's clear understanding of sexual things, so often lacking," 

said Frau Krukenberg ("Die Aufgabe der Mutter," 

_Sexualpaedagogik_, p. 13), while Max Enderlin, a teacher, said on 

the same occasion ("Die Sexuelle Frage in die Volksschule," id., 

p. 35): "It is the mother who has to give the child his first 

explanations, for it is to his mother that he first naturally 

comes with his questions." In England, Canon Lyttelton, who is 

distinguished among the heads of public schools not least by his 

clear and admirable statements on these questions, states 

(_Mothers and Sons_, p. 99) that the mother's part in the sexual 

enlightenment and sexual guardianship of her son is of paramount 

importance, and should begin at the earliest years. J.H. Badley, 

another schoolmaster ("The Sex Difficulty," _Broad Views_, June, 

1904), also states that the mother's part comes first. Northcote 

(_Christianity and Sex Problems_, p. 25) believes that the duty 

of the parents is primary in this matter, the family doctor and 

the schoolmaster coming in at a later stage. In America, Dr. Mary 

Wood Allen, who occupies a prominent and influential position in 

women's social movements, urges (in _Child-Confidence Rewarded_, 

and other pamphlets) that a mother should begin to tell her child 

these things as soon as he begins to ask questions, the age of 

four not being too young, and explains how this may be done, 

giving examples of its happy results in promoting a sweet 


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